18. Venerable Amaro: No Empty Ideal

28 Tháng Hai 20208:17 CH(Xem: 154)
18. Venerable Amaro: No Empty Ideal


SeeingTheWay_BSeeing The Way

 

* Buddhist Reflections on the Spiritual Life

for Ven Ajahn Chah

* An anthology of teachings by

English-speaking disciples of Ajahn Chah
* Source: dhammatalks.net, holybooks.com

 

____________________


NO EMPTY IDEAL - Venerable Amaro

 

 

Venerable Amaro (Jeremy Horner) was born in Kent, England in 1956. He studied Psychology and Physiology at Bedford College, University of London. His first spiritual interest arose on reading the works of Rudolph Steiner. Upon completing his degree, he had the chance to travel to Asia -- a friend offered him work as a groom on a cargo plane transporting racehorses to Malaysia.

 

He visited North-East Thailand on the recommendation of some people he met while travelling. Looking for a place to stay a few nights (before going on to Japan), he heard about Wat Pah Nanachat and its Western monks. The visit was eventful -- he took an instant liking to the monks, felt immediately at home, and decided to stay. He became an anagarika, and then a samanera four months later (in 1978). The following year he received upasampada from Ajahn Chah.

 

Venerable Amaro stayed in Thailand for two years before family illness called him back to England. He then joined Ajahn Sumedho at the newly established Chithurst Monastery. Once while in London, he decided to look up a cousin of his whom he had never met: the illustrious scholar, translator and president of the Pali Text Society, I.B. Horner. Unfortunately, she died before a meeting between them could be arranged.

 

In 1983 Ajahn Sumedho asked him to take up residence at Harnham Vihara, and he requested (and was given permission) to make his way there on foot. He wrote a book about the 830-mile walk: Tudong -- the Long Road North, in 1984.

 

This talk was given by the Venerable Amaro during a retreat conducted for lay people at

Amaravati Buddhist Centre in April 1986.

 

 

 

"What 'Buddha' means in our lives is more important

than whether the Buddha Gotama actually lived,

taught and did all the things he is said to have done."

 

 

BEING ON A RETREAT LIKE THIS, a great sense of fellowship develops: a sense of everybody being on the same journey. Even though we come from an enormous variety of backgrounds, men and women, young and old, we are all heading for the same place. This is something we know in our hearts is true that even though we may have different names for the goal of the spiritual life, something in us knows we are all heading in the same direction.

 

The most important thing about religious practice of any sort is that it is to be a process of awakening; it must not get trapped into being an empty ideal that we worship, instead of being a reality we open to. Many rivers of blood have been shed arguing about different names for the goal: 'The Holy City', 'Union with Brahma', 'Kismet', 'Nibbana'. As long as there have been people there have been ways of symbolising the state of peace, security and fulfilment. So, if we can avoid getting caught up with the wording of the signpost ending up hanging onto the signpost itself as long as there is the resolution to make the journey, we will arrive, regardless of the name of the destination we have used.

 

How could the goals be different? Whether one is brought up a Christian, a Hindu or a Jew, as an English or an Asian person, how could the fundamental nature of the mind be different? How could it possibly be affected just by what we believe? Just as the nature of water is not affected by the shape of the vessel into which it is poured, so too the nature of Ultimate Truth the nationality and the conditioning of the person in whom it is realised does not affect the way it actually is.

 

It is very important to remain determined to make the journey, to follow the signposts to awakening. The Buddha was extremely careful in the way he taught, to account for the human tendency to wander off the path. Our minds are so active and bright that we will always find some fascinating things to get involved in along the way: interesting palaces to visit, plants to investigate, people to chat with by the road. So he kept pointing out to people the crucial need to make the journey, rather than to just talk or think about it.

 

Around any religious teaching, over the years, there seem to grow up an enormous quantity of metaphysical and philosophical ideas; rites and rituals; traditions of what to eat, how to arrange marriages and funerals; how to talk about the different qualities of our minds and the different factors that influence our lives. Although we might start off with basic symbols to represent simple truths, in time they become things we worship in themselves. The institution becomes more important than the people who comprise it, and it is forgotten what the institution, and the symbol, were actually for. We end up worshipping the signpost rather than allowing it to point out the way to us.

 

To avoid this the Buddha kept his teaching very simple. One day he was walking through a forest with his monks; he picked up a handful of leaves and said: 'What do you think, bhikkhus, are there more leaves in my hand or more leaves in the forest?' 'The leaves in your hand are few and the leaves in the forest are many, 'they replied. 'So too, 'said the Buddha, 'the things that I know are comparable to the leaves in the forest, but that which I teach you is just as much as I hold in my hand.'

 

All the Buddha knew in terms of how the world works, the history of the universe, the astral realms, the mechanics of nature in all its multifaceted complexity all this he laid aside. He kept his teaching simply to that which was crucial to liberation.

 

Because of this he refrained from getting into any kind of metaphysical discussion; he would never engage in that. Whenever anyone would try to draw him on such a point 'What was the Ultimate beginning?', 'What happens to an enlightened being when he dies?' he would remain silent. He simply would not pursue it. Firstly, because these things are all unimportant, in that they do not lead directly to liberation; and secondly, to avoid compounding the wrong views of the questioner. He used a very good simile to explain this once: 'If I had a fire and put it out, and then I asked you: Where has the fire gone north, south, east or west?, what would you answer?' 'Well, it's a foolish question, because those things do not apply. It's just gone out, it hasn't gone anywhere. 'The Buddha replied: 'Exactly so the way you phrase the question assumes a particular kind of answer. So to give any answer is to go along with your mistaken view.'

 

So he would only teach that which related directly to what a person can do in order to realise the Truth. Whenever he did talk about Ultimate Reality, he would use the most impersonal and open terms: 'It is wonderful; immanent, peaceful; the Unoriginated, Unconditioned' which do not give a great deal to grab a hold of! It is not some 'thing' one can externalise and idealise, but a quality one can open to and realise.

 

The essence of all spiritual practice, in our human condition, is to learn to look beyond the sensory world, learn to abide beyond perception. One way that we can do this is to look upon life as something that flows through the mind. Rather than thinking of oneself as a person who is going places, consider these as images going through the mind. Right now we have the image of the meditation hall, Amaravati; this is what we can perceive. The sound of this voice; the feeling of sitting on a cushion; the sense of sight; see that all these things flow through the mind like a current. When Ajahn Sumedho went travelling recently he said he made the determination before he left that he wasn't going to go around the world, he was just going to let the world go through his mind. Afterwards he said the result was very peaceful: he went everywhere, saw everyone, did everything, but the sense of movement, of a person heading towards somewhere, was absent; there was stillness in its place.

 

If we stop looking upon our sensory experience as being so solid and absolute, we see that there are just these perceptions, and the knowing the sense of awareness and being. This is the way that the mind is liberated, the way beyond birth and death. There was a woman staying here in January who had terminal cancer, she came to die here as a nun. This was during a monastic retreat period so we had a lot of opportunity to contemplate the dying process. One afternoon, as I was doing some walking meditation, it struck me very clearly that when you look upon your life as a succession of images that the mind is aware of, then why should that be broken by the moment of death? The body is something that is perceived in the mind so, at the moment of death, if there has been awareness of the body alive, then surely there will just be awareness of the body dead. The body dies just another perception in the mind. What that mind is attached to, where it goes, who it belongs to are all the north, south, east and west of the matter. They are questions which do not really apply.

 

This is being with the mind that is beyond birth and death being that knowing, being Buddha. When you see a thought arising in your mind, it appears, has its life span, and then it's gone. Though the birth and death of the body are probably the most powerful experiences we have in a human life, fundamentally there is no difference between them and the perception of a thought. With meditation practice there is the development of understanding how things come out of the void and go back into the void again. The more familiar we get with this process, the more the mysteries of existence resolve themselves. So it's not as though you know the answer, in so many words, to, 'Where do I come from, where do I go?', but you don't need to put it into words. You know the mind out of which everything arises and into which everything disappears.

 

By training yourself to just be that knowing, be that which is the source and goal of all things, you see the fear of the unknown dissolve. Death is frightening when we don't understand; but the more one knows the mind, the more it' s no longer the unknown. There is no more fear because you realise, with the death of the body, what is there fundamentally different that could happen? How could it not just be another thing that comes into the mind, that we bear with and then see vanish? Since we know the mind before and after things have been born into it, we know there is nothing to be frightened of.

 

In order to be able to deal with life this way we have to develop an undiscriminating attitude, welcoming everything that we experience. Welcoming the pleasant is very easy; pleasure is what we like. But there are unpleasant qualities that keep arising too: feelings of irritation and pride, desire, one's inability to be a perfect human being welcoming all of that is a different story, isn't it?

 

I remember talking with Ajahn Sumedho one day about the practice of loving-kindness. 'It' s those foolish and petty, childish emotional reactions I find hard to deal with. 'Right,' he replied, 'but notice the way we describe them petty, foolish, childish does that sound to you like metta? Does that set things up for you to accept life wholeheartedly? Or does it show that you have already prejudged the whole experience? Because that' s what I used to do. You have to welcome it all sincerely.'

 

As I began to apply this advice I realised how much of my time had been trying to fend off all those little imps and demons. All those wavelets of desire, fear and discomfort; subtle feelings that had never been very clear. Every time anything arose which brought a dismissive reaction up in my mind, I would say, very carefully and deliberately: 'Oh, jealousy, how nice of you to come! Have a seat. Pride! Hello... cup of tea?' The effect on my mind was astonishing. I realised how much of a problem I had been making out of my life so much judging and choosing over what I wanted to arise in my thoughts.

 

I realised also that every time I reacted negatively, pushing things away, that action implied that there was something to fear. That this feeling or this thought was dangerous; that it was going to really hurt me, or invade me; that it was something that was really me and mine. As I began to welcome it all I realised that when you accept everything, only then can you sense that, after all, there is nothing to fear. None of it really belongs to a self or comes from a self. It cannot touch the mind which knows, cannot affect its nature. Whatever shape of vessel you pour the water into, with this same total accommodation, the water changes to the shape of the bottle. It doesn't say: 'I will not be poured into a square bottle, square bottles are not my scene. Round bottles only, please!'

 

To push away or grasp a hold of the beautiful and the ugly, the noble and the sordid, is just as absurd really, isn't it?

 

When there is complete acceptance, there is just the sense of being the knowing, being that which is aware of all that comes through the mind. This is what the image of the Buddha at the moment of enlightenment symbolises one often sees pictures of the Buddha sitting under the Bodhi tree, with an aura of light around him. Very still. Awake. And all about him there is every kind of alluring, terrifying, heart-rending form imaginable the hordes of Mara. Despite all his efforts, however, Mara fails to move the Buddha, and this is the moment of the Buddha's enlightenment. He knew: the beautiful, the terrifying, the sense of duty all of these were just images in the mind. There is nothing one can grasp, there is nothing to fear, none of it can really touch the mind.

 

Now this is a symbol, and whether or not the incident occurred exactly as it is described is not as important as what it symbolises. For one who practises the teaching, what 'Buddha' means in our lives is more important than whether the Buddha Gotama actually lived, taught and did all the things he is said to have done. 'Buddha' is that awakened nature of the mind, the heart of the mind. That in you which is wise, which knows, which is clear and bright. And that is what the Buddha on the night of his enlightenment represents that knowing.

 

All the hordes of Mara these are just the thoughts and feelings, hopes and fears, memories, pleasures and pains of daily activity. These may not be as grand as the alluring daughters, the terrifying demons or the tears of old King Suddhodana getting the children to school, trying to please the boss, brushing your teeth but for us these are the hordes of Mara. The images of daily life come pouring through the mind but, if we are awake, we can see that none of it affects the mind' s true nature that sense of stillness, knowing, spaciousness and clarity which the Buddha represents.

 

Most of the time, however, we find ourselves moving away from that point. That's our habitual reaction to the world grasping after things or running away from things. I remember, when I was a very small child, often trying to jump into the middle of my shadow, but however hard I jumped I just landed on the shadows feet. And I would run after my shadow and then jump but where would I land up? Just in the same place all over again. And this is what we do with our lives the things that we desire, it' s like running after shadows. You try to catch hold, reaching for the desire so close, so close, and then you grasp it and then... and you haven't really got it. Somehow it's not what you expected, it's different, not what you really wanted.

 

And then to run from your shadow to be afraid, you keep turning around: 'It's still behind me, run faster, got to get away. 'When we stop and look though, we realise: 'Well, it's just my shadow. 'You can't get away from it, but there's nothing in it to be afraid of, it's just a shadow.

 

So when we stop and rest in the stillness of knowing, we know in our hearts that all we desire, all we fear, are just shadows. There is no substance there nothing which can make us more complete and nothing which can threaten us. This is the real freedom of mind.

 

So being Buddha, being that still, aware, noble being, is both the goal and the practice that we follow the goal of the practice and the substance of the practice are the same. The religious path is thus one of simply learning to rest in being that Knowing, being Buddha, awake and aware.



____________________




Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
28 Tháng Hai 2020(Xem: 406)
16 Tháng Giêng 2020(Xem: 683)
05 Tháng Giêng 2020(Xem: 801)
23 Tháng Mười Hai 2019(Xem: 678)
30 Tháng Ba 20209:02 CH(Xem: 163)
With so many books available on Buddhism, one may ask if there is need for yet another text. Although books on Buddhism are available on the market, many of them are written for those who have already acquired a basic understanding of the Buddha Dhamma.
29 Tháng Ba 20209:50 SA(Xem: 184)
Với số sách Phật quá nhiều hiện nay, câu hỏi đặt ra là có cần thêm một cuốn nữa hay không. Mặc dù có rất nhiều sách Phật Giáo, nhưng đa số đều được viết nhằm cho những người đã có căn bản Phật Pháp. Một số được viết theo văn chương lối cổ, dịch nghĩa
28 Tháng Ba 202010:51 SA(Xem: 161)
Quan niệm khổ của mỗi người tùy thuộc vào hoàn cảnh trong cuộc sống hiện tạitrình độ nhận thức của mỗi người. Cho nên con đường giải thoát khổ của mỗi người cũng phải thích ứng theo nguyện vọng của mỗi người. Con đường giải thoát khổ này hướng dẫn
27 Tháng Ba 20203:30 CH(Xem: 126)
TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC 4 CÕI - Trong 4 loại ấy, gọi là 4 cõi. Tức là cõi khổ, cõi vui, Dục-giới, Sắc-giới, cõi Vô-sắc-giới. NÓI VỀ 4 CÕI KHỔ - Trong nhóm 4 cõi ấy, cõi khổ cũng có 4 là: địa ngục, Bàng sanh, Ngạ quỉ và Atula. NÓI VỀ 7 CÕI VUI DỤC GIỚI -
26 Tháng Ba 20207:16 CH(Xem: 183)
Ni sư Kee Nanayon (1901-1979) là một trong những vị nữ thiền sư nổi tiếng ở Thái Lan. Năm 1945, bà thành lập thiền viện Khao-suan-luang dành cho các nữ Phật tử tu thiền trong vùng đồi núi tỉnh Rajburi, miền tây Thái Lan. Ngoài các bài pháp được truyền đi
24 Tháng Ba 20202:32 CH(Xem: 193)
Sự giải thoát tinh thần, theo lời dạy của Đức Phật, được thành tựu bằng việc đoạn trừ các lậu hoặc (ô nhiễm trong tâm). Thực vậy, bậc A-la-hán thường được nói đến như bậc lậu tận - Khināsava, bậc đã đoạn trừ mọi lậu hoặc. Chính vì thế, người đi tìm chân lý cần phải hiểu rõ những lậu hoặc này là gì, và làm cách nào để loại trừ được nó.
23 Tháng Ba 20203:56 CH(Xem: 219)
Rất nhiều sách trình bày nhầm lẫn giữa Định và Tuệ hay Chỉ và Quán, đưa đến tình trạng định không ra định, tuệ chẳng ra tuệ, hoặc hành thiền định hóa ra chỉ là những “ngoại thuật” (những hình thức tập trung tư tưởng hay ý chímục đích khác với định nhà Phật), và hành thiền tuệ lại có kết quả của định rồi tưởng lầm là đã chứng được
22 Tháng Ba 20209:08 CH(Xem: 178)
Everyone is aware of the benefits of physical training. However, we are not merely bodies, we also possess a mind which needs training. Mind training or meditation is the key to self-mastery and to that contentment which brings happiness. Of all forces the force of the mind is the most potent. It is a power by itself. To understand the real nature
21 Tháng Ba 20209:58 CH(Xem: 214)
Chúng ta lấy làm phấn khởi mà nhận thấy rằng hiện nay càng ngày người ta càng thích thú quan tâm đến pháp hành thiền, nhất là trong giới người Tây phương, và pháp môn nầy đang phát triễn mạnh mẽ. Trong những năm gần đây, các nhà tâm lý học khuyên
20 Tháng Ba 20208:30 CH(Xem: 192)
Bốn Sự Thật Cao Quý được các kinh sách Hán ngữ gọi là Tứ Diệu Đế, là căn bản của toàn bộ Giáo Huấn của Đức Phật và cũng là một đề tài thuyết giảng quen thuộc. Do đó đôi khi chúng ta cũng có cảm tưởng là mình hiểu rõ khái niệm này, thế nhưng thật ra thì ý nghĩa của Bốn Sự Thật Cao Quý rất sâu sắc và thuộc nhiều cấp bậc
17 Tháng Ba 20205:51 CH(Xem: 314)
Mindfulness with Breathing is a meditation technique anchored In our breathing, it is an exquisite tool for exploring life through subtle awareness and active investigation of the breathing and life. The breath is life, to stop breathing is to die. The breath is vital, natural, soothing, revealing. It is our constant companion. Wherever we go,
16 Tháng Ba 20204:16 CH(Xem: 305)
Giác niệm về hơi thở là một kỹ thuật quán tưởng cắm sâu vào hơi thở của chúng ta. Đó là một phương tiện tinh vi để thám hiểm đời sống xuyên qua ý thức tế nhị và sự điều nghiên tích cực về hơi thởđời sống. Hơi thở chính là đời sống; ngừng thở là chết. Hơi thở thiết yếu cho đời sống, làm cho êm dịu, tự nhiên, và năng phát hiện.
15 Tháng Ba 202012:00 CH(Xem: 252)
Phật giáođạo Phật là những giáo lý và sự tu tập để dẫn tới mục tiêu rốt ráo của nó là giác ngộgiải thoát khỏi vòng luân hồi sinh tử. Tuy nhiên, (a) mọi người thế tục đều đang sống trong các cộng đồng dân cư, trong các tập thể, đoàn thể, và trong xã hội; và (b) những người xuất gia dù đã bỏ tục đi tu nhưng họ vẫn đang sống tu
13 Tháng Ba 20209:16 CH(Xem: 230)
Người ta thường để ý đến nhiều tính cách khác nhau trong những người hành thiền. Một số người xem thiền như là một thứ có tính thực nghiệm, phê phán, chiêm nghiệm; những người khác lại tin tưởng hơn, tận tâm hơn, và xem nó như là lí tưởng. Một số có vẻ thích nghi tốt và hài lòng với chính mình và những gì xung quanh,
12 Tháng Ba 20209:36 SA(Xem: 348)
Kinh Đại Niệm Xứ - Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna được xem là bài kinh quan trọng nhất trên phương diện thực hành thiền Phật giáo. Các thiền phái Minh Sát, dù khác nhau về đối tượng quán niệm, vẫn không xa khỏi bốn lĩnh vực: Thân, Thọ, Tâm, và Pháp mà Đức Phật
10 Tháng Ba 20202:09 CH(Xem: 322)
Giới học thiền ở nước ta mấy thập niên gần đây đã bắt đầu làm quen với thiền Vipassanā. Số lượng sách báo về chuyên đề này được dịch và viết tuy chưa nhiều lắm nhưng chúng ta đã thấy tính chất phong phú đa dạng của Thiền Minh Sát hay còn gọi là Thiền Tuệ hoặc Thiền Quán này. Thiền Vipassanā luôn có một nguyên tắc nhất quán
10 Tháng Ba 202010:20 SA(Xem: 305)
Trong tất cả các thiền sư cận đại, bà Achaan Naeb là một thiền sư đặc biệt hơn cả. Bà là một nữ cư sĩ đã từng dạy thiền, dạy đạo cho các bậc cao tăng, trong đó có cả ngài Hộ Tông, Tăng thống Giáo hội Tăng già Nguyên thủy Việt Nam cũng đã từng theo học thiền với bà một thời gian. Năm 44 tuổi, Bà đã bắt đầu dạy thiền
08 Tháng Ba 202011:08 SA(Xem: 262)
A.B.: Đầu tiên, khi họ hỏi Sư: “Sư có muốn nhận giải thưởng này không?” và Sư đã đồng ý. Nhưng phản ứng đầu tiên ngay sau đó là: “Tại sao Sư lại muốn nhận giải thưởng này? Sư là một nhà Sư Phật Giáo, đây là việc một nhà Sư (cần phải) làm. Là một nhà Sư, chúng ta đi truyền giáo, đi phục vụ, và chúng ta không nhất thiết phải đòi hỏi
07 Tháng Ba 20205:16 CH(Xem: 332)
Biên tập từ các bài pháp thoại của ngài Thiền sư Ajahn Brahmavamso trong khóa thiền tích cực 9 ngày, vào tháng 12-1997, tại North Perth, Tây Úc. Nguyên tác Anh ngữ được ấn tống lần đầu tiên năm 1998, đến năm 2003 đã được tái bản 7 lần, tổng cộng 60 ngàn quyển. Ngoài ra, tập sách này cũng đã được dịch sang tiếng Sinhala
06 Tháng Ba 20209:21 SA(Xem: 334)
Trước khi nói về phương pháplợi ích của thiền Minh Sát Tuệ, chúng ta cần điểm qua một số vấn đề liên quan đến "pháp môn thiền định" Phật giáo. Gần đây, dường như pháp môn thiền của Phật giáo bị lãng quên và không còn đóng vai trò quan trọng
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 702)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 2292)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 3682)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
30 Tháng Ba 20209:02 CH(Xem: 163)
With so many books available on Buddhism, one may ask if there is need for yet another text. Although books on Buddhism are available on the market, many of them are written for those who have already acquired a basic understanding of the Buddha Dhamma.
29 Tháng Ba 20209:50 SA(Xem: 184)
Với số sách Phật quá nhiều hiện nay, câu hỏi đặt ra là có cần thêm một cuốn nữa hay không. Mặc dù có rất nhiều sách Phật Giáo, nhưng đa số đều được viết nhằm cho những người đã có căn bản Phật Pháp. Một số được viết theo văn chương lối cổ, dịch nghĩa
28 Tháng Ba 202010:51 SA(Xem: 161)
Quan niệm khổ của mỗi người tùy thuộc vào hoàn cảnh trong cuộc sống hiện tạitrình độ nhận thức của mỗi người. Cho nên con đường giải thoát khổ của mỗi người cũng phải thích ứng theo nguyện vọng của mỗi người. Con đường giải thoát khổ này hướng dẫn
04 Tháng Ba 20209:20 CH(Xem: 353)
Chàng kia nuôi một bầy dê. Đúng theo phương pháp, tay nghề giỏi giang. Nên dê sinh sản từng đàn. Từ ngàn con đến chục ngàn rất mau. Nhưng chàng hà tiện hàng đầu. Không hề dám giết con nào để ăn. Hoặc là đãi khách đến thăm. Dù ai năn nỉ cũng bằng thừa thôi
11 Tháng Hai 20206:36 SA(Xem: 523)
Kinh Thập Thiện là một quyển kinh nhỏ ghi lại buổi thuyết pháp của Phật cho cả cư sĩ lẫn người xuất gia, hoặc cho các loài thủy tộc nhẫn đến bậc A-la-hán và Bồ-tát. Xét hội chúng dự buổi thuyết pháp này, chúng ta nhận định được giá trị quyển kinh thế nào rồi. Pháp Thập thiện là nền tảng đạo đức, cũng là nấc thang đầu
09 Tháng Hai 20204:17 CH(Xem: 510)
Quyển “Kinh Bốn Mươi Hai Chương Giảng Giải” được hình thành qua hai năm ghi chép, phiên tả với lòng chân thành muốn phổ biến những lời Phật dạy. Đầu tiên đây là những buổi học dành cho nội chúng Tu viện Lộc Uyển, sau đó lan dần đến những cư sĩ hữu duyên.
01 Tháng Hai 202010:51 SA(Xem: 711)
“Kinh Chú Tâm Tỉnh Giác” là một trong hai bài kinh căn bảnĐức Phật đã nêu lên một phép luyện tập vô cùng thiết thực, cụ thể và trực tiếp về thiền định, đó là phép thiền định chú tâm thật tỉnh giác và thật mạnh vào bốn lãnh vực thân xác, cảm giác, tâm thức và các hiện tượng tâm thần từ bên trong chúng.
31 Tháng Giêng 20207:00 SA(Xem: 885)
“Kinh Chú Tâm vào Hơi Thở” là một trong hai bài kinh căn bảnĐức Phật đã nêu lên một phép luyện tập vô cùng thiết thực, cụ thể và trực tiếp về thiền định, đó là sự chú tâm thật mạnh dựa vào hơi thở. Bản kinh này được dịch giả Hoang Phong chuyển ngữ từ kinh Anapanasati Sutta (Trung Bộ Kinh, MN 118).
24 Tháng Giêng 20208:00 SA(Xem: 6017)
Phước lành thay, thời gian nầy vui như ngày lễ hội, Vì có một buổi sáng thức dậy vui vẻhạnh phúc, Vì có một giây phút quý báu và một giờ an lạc, Cho những ai cúng dường các vị Tỳ Kheo. Vào ngày hôm ấy, lời nói thiện, làm việc thiện, Ý nghĩ thiện và ước nguyện cao quý, Mang lại phước lợi cho những ai thực hành;