00. ANUMONDANA

18 Tháng Ba 202010:29 SA(Xem: 421)
00. ANUMONDANA


GiacNiemVeHoiTho_BMindfulness With Breathing - ­Giác Niệm Về Hơi Thở

Bhikkhu Buddhadasa

Translated from the Thai by Santikaro Bhikkhu

Thiện Nhựt phỏng dịch

Source-Nguồn: dhammatalks.net, ftp.budaedu.org, budsas.org, thuvienhoasen.org

 

____________________

ANUMONDANA

 

(To all Dhamma Comrades, those helping to spread Dhamma:)

 

            Break out the funds to spread Dhamma to let Faithful Trust flow,

Broadcast majestic Dhamma to radiate long living joy.

            Release unexcelled Dhamma to tap the spring of Virtue,

Let safely peaceful delight flow like a cool mountain stream.

 

            Dhamma leaves of many years sprouting anew, reaching out,

To unfold and bloom in the Dhamma Centers of all towns,

            To spread lustrous Dhamma and in hearts glorified plant it,

Before long, weeds of sorrow, pain, and affliction will flee.

 

            As Virtue revives and resounds throughout Thai society,

All hearts feel certain love toward those born, ageing, and dying.

            Congratulations and Blessings to all Dhamma Comrades,

You who share Dhamma to widen the people's prosperous joy.

 

            Heartiest appreciation from Buddhadasa Indapanno,

Buddhist Science ever shines beams of Bodhi longlasting,

            In grateful service, fruits of merit and wholesome successes,

Are all devoted in honor to Lord Father Buddha,

 

            Thus may the Thai people be renowned for their Virtue,

May perfect success through Buddhist Science awaken their hearts,

            May the King and His Family live long in triumphant strength,

May joy long endure throughout this our world upon earth.

 

 

from,

buddhadasa_sign 

 


Mokkhabalarama

Chaiya, 2 November 2530

(translated by Santikaro Bhikkhu, 3 February 2531 (1988))

 

 

____________________

 

 

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION  

 

This edition includes a complete translation of "The Mindfulness With Breathing Discourse" (Appendix E). We have added the introduc­tory passages that were left out of the first edition. We also include Ajahn Buddhadasa's notes to the discourse. The full discourse and the notes will provide the reader with rich material for reflection and a fitting summary of this book, and of all Dhamma practice. The remainder of the text is unchanged, except for the correc­tion of printing and spelling errors. Our thanks to everyone who has made this edition possible.

 

Santikaro Bhikkhu

Suan Mokkhabalarama

December 2531 (1988)

 

____________________

 

 

TRANSLATOR-EDITOR’S PREFACE 

 

Welcome to Mindfulness with Breathing.

 

Mindfulness with Breathing is a meditation technique anchored In our breathing, it is an exquisite tool for exploring life through subtle awareness and active investigation of the breathing and life. The breath is life, to stop breathing is to die. The breath is vital, natural, soothing, revealing. It is our constant companion. Wherever we go, at all times, the breath sustains life and provides the opportunity (or spiritual development. In practicing mindfulness upon and through the breathing, we develop and strengthen our mental abilities and spiritual qualities. We learn how to relax the body and calm the mind. As the mind quiets and clears, we investigate how life, how the mind and body, unfolds. We discover the fundamental reality of human existence and learn how to live our lives in harmony with that reality. And all the while, we are anchored in the breath, nourished and sustained by the breath, soothed and balanced by the breath, sensitive to the breathing in and breathing out. This is our practice.

 

Mindfulness with Breathing is the system of meditation or mental cultivation (citta-bhavana) often practiced and most often taught by the Buddha Gautama. For more than 2500 years, this practice has been preserved and passed along. It continues to be a vital part of the lives of practicing Buddhists in Asia and around the world. Similar practices are found in other religious traditions, too. In fact, forms of Mindfulness with Breathing predate the Buddha's appearance. These were perfected by him to encompass his most profound teachings and discoveries. Thus, the comprehensive form of Mindfulness with Breathing taught by him leads to the realization of humanity's highest potential – enlightenment. It has other fruits as wel1 and so offers something - of both immediate and long term value, of both mundane and spiritual benefit - to people at all stages of spiritual development.

 

In the Pali language of the Buddhist scriptures this practice called "Anapanasati" which means "mindfulness with in-breaths and out-breaths." The complete system of practice is described in the Pali texts and further explained in their commentaries. Over the years, an extensive literature has developed. The Venerable Ajahn Buddhadasa has drawn on these 'sources, especially the Buddha's words, for his own practice. Out of that experience, he has given a wide variety of explanations about how and why to practice Mind­fulness with Breathing. This book contains some of his most recent talks about this meditation practice.

 

The lectures included here were chosen for two reasons. First, they were given to Westerners attending the monthly meditation courses at Suan Mokkh. In speaking to Western meditators, Ajahn Buddhadasa uses a straight-forward, no-frills approach. He, need not, go into the cultural interests of traditional Thai Buddhists. Instead, he prefers a scientific, rational, analytic attitude. And rather than limit the instruction to Buddhists, he emphasizes the universal, natural humanness of Anapanasati. Further, he endeavors to res­pond to the needs, difficulties, questions, and abilities of beginning Western meditators, especially our guests at Suan Mokkh.

 

Second, this manual is aimed at "serious, beginners." By "beginner" we mean people who are fairly new to this practice and its theory. Some, have just begun, while others have some practical experience but lack information about where and how to develop their practice further. Both can benefit from clear instructions con­cerning their current situation and the overall perspective. By "serious" we mean those who have an interest deeper than idle curiosity. They will read and reread this manual carefully, will think through this information adequately, and will apply the resulting understanding with sincerity and commitment. Although some people like to think that we do not have to read books about meditation, that we need only to do-it, we must be careful to know what it is we are doing. We must begin with some source of information, suffi­ciently clear and complete, to practice meaningfully. If we do not live with or near a competent teacher, a manual such as this is necessary. The beginner needs information simple enough to give a dear pic­ture of the entire process, yet requires enough detail to turn the pic­ture into reality. This manual should strike the proper balance. There is enough here to guide successful practice, but not so much as to complicate and overwhelm. Those who are serious will find what they need without difficulty.

 

The main body of this manual comes from the series of lec­tures given during our September 1986 meditation course. For this course, Ajahn Poh (Venerable Bodhi Buddhadhammo, the initiator of these courses and &tan Mokkh's Abbot) asked Ajahn Buddhadasa to give the meditation instruction directly. Each morning, after breakfast, the retreatants gathered at "the Curved Rock," Suan Mokkh's outdoor lecture area. Venerable Ajahn spoke in Thai, with this translator interpreting into English. The talks were recorded and many people, both foreign and Thai, requested copies of the series.

 

Early last year, Khun Wutichai Taweesaksiriphol and the Dhamma Study-Practice Group asked Venerable Ajahn for permis­sion to publish both the Thai and English versions. Once the tapes were transcribed, however, it turned out that the original English interpretation was unsuitable for publication. It contained inac­curacies and was unnecessarily repetitive. Therefore, the original interpreter has revised his first attempt, or, we could say, translated it anew. This new rendering follows the original Thai closely, although some additions have been kept. Anyone who compares this version with the tapes will appreciate the improvement.

 

In the course of revision and preparation, we decided to append material to make the manual more comprehensive. In more recent talks, Ajahn Buddhadasa has discussed perspectives on Anapanasati not covered in the September talks. Appendices A, B, and C are selections from three of these talks, with the parts that repeat material covered in earlier talks edited out. This new infor­mation emphasizes the significance and purpose of Anapanasati. Appendix D is a substantial revision of a talk given by the interpreter as a summary of Venerable Ajahn's seven lectures. Appendix E leaves the final word with our prime inspiration and original source - the Lord Buddha's "Mindfulness with Breathing Discourse (Anapanasati Sutta)." The heart of the fundamental text for this system of meditation is presented here in a new translation. We hope, that the exquisite simplicity and directness of the Blessed One's words will gather all of the preceding explanations into one clear focus. That focus, of course, must aim at the only real purpose there is in life - nibbana.

 

If you have yet to sit down and "watch" your breaths, this book will point out why you should, and how. Still, until you try it, and keep trying, it will be impossible to completely understand these words. So read this book through at least once, or however many times it takes to get the gist of the practice. Then, as you practice, read and reread the sections most relevant to what you are doing and are about to do. These words will become tangible only through ap­plying them, and thus strengthened they will guide the development more securely. You need enough intellectual understanding to be clear about what you need to do and how to go about it. While focusing on the immediate requirements of today's learning, do not lose sight of the overall path, structure, method, and goal. Then you will practice with confidence and success.

 

In addition to its primary purpose, teaching how to practice Anapanasati correctly, this manual serves a purpose which the casual reader will overlook. With the careful study advocated above, however, you will discover that every central teaching of Buddhism, true Buddhism in its pristine form, is mentioned here. This book, then, provides an outline of the essential teachings. In this way our intellectual study is neatly integrated with our mental cultivation practice. For how could we separate the two? To fully understand our practice we must do our Dhamma homework, and vice versa.

 

Having both in one place should help those who are confused about what and how much to study. Just make sure that you understand all the things discussed here, that is enough.

 

The benefits of correct, sustained Anapanasati practice are numerous. Some are specifically religious and others are mundane. Although Ajahn Buddhadasa covers them extensively in the seventh lecture, we should mention a few here at the beginning. First, Anapanasati is good for our health, both physical and mental. Long, deep, peaceful breathing is good for the body. Proper breathing calms us down and helps us to let go of the tension, high blood pressure, nervousness, and ulcers that ruin so many lives these days. We can learn the simple and beautiful act of sitting quietly alive to the breathing, free of stress, worry, and busyness. This gentle calm can be maintained in our other daily activities and will allow us to do everything with more grace and skill. 

 

Anapanasati brings us into touch with reality and nature. We often live in our heads - in ideas, dreams, memories, plans, words, and all that. So we do not have the opportunity to understand our own bodies even, never taking the time to observe them (except when the excitement of illness and sex occurs). In Anapanasati, through the breathing, we become sensitive to our bodies and their nature. We ground ourselves in this basic reality of human existence, which provides the stability we need to cope wisely with feelings, emotions, thoughts, memories, and all the rest of our inner conditioning. No longer blown about by these experiences, we can accept them for what they are and learn the lesson they have to teach us. We begin to learn what is what, what is real and what is not, what is necessary and what is unnecessary, what is conflict and what is peace.

 

With Anapanasati we learn to live in the present moment, the only place one can truly live. Dwelling in the past, which has died, or dreaming in the future, which brings death, is not really living as a human being ought to live. Each breath, however, is a living reality within the boundless here-now. To be aware of them is to live, ready to grow into and with whatever comes next.

 

Lastly, as far as this brief discussion is concerned, Anapanasati helps us to ease up on and let go of the selfishness that is destroying our lives and world. Our societies and planet are tortured by the lack of peace. The problem is so serious that even politicians and the military-industrialists pay lip-service to it. Still, nothing much is done to blossom genuine peace. Merely external (and superficial) ap­proaches are taken, while the source of conflict is within us, each of us. The conflict, strife, struggle, and competition, all the violence and crime, the exploitation and dishonesty, arises out of our self­centered striving, which is born out of our selfish thinking. Anapanasati will get us to the bottom of this nasty "I-ing" and “my-ing" which spawns selfishness. There is no need to shout for peace when we merely need breath with wise awareness.

 

Many people who share our aspiration for peace, within both individual hearts and the world we share, visit Suan Mokkh. We offer this manual to them and all others who seek the Lord Buddha's path of peace, who accept this the duty and joy of all human beings. We hope that this book will enrich your practice of Anapanasati and your life. May we all realize the purpose for which we were born.

 

Santikaro Bhikkhu

Suan Mokkhabalarama

New Year's 2531 (1988)

 

____________________

 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

Dhamma projects give us opportunities to join together in meritorious work and the service of our comrades in birth, ageing, illness, and death. A number of friends have given freely of their energy, time, and skills. Although there is no better reward than the contentment and peace that comes with doing our duty in Dhamma, nevertheless, we would like to acknowledge and bless their contributions.

 

The Thai manuscript was transcribed by Jiaranai Lansuchip.

 

The English manuscript was transcribed by Supis Vajanarat and edited the first time by Pradittha Siripan. 

 

Dhammakamo Bhikkhu, Viriyanando Bhikkhu, John Busch, Kris Hoover and Mae Chi Dhammadinna helped to proof read the English version.

 

The Thai and English language typing was done by Supis Vajanarat.

 

Miscellaneous errands were run by Wutichi Taveesaksiriphol and Phra Dusadee Metamkuro.

 

Funds for the first printing of this manual were donated by Dr.Priya Tasatiapradit, Amnuey Suwankiri, Supis Vajanarat, and The Dhamma Study-Practice Group.

 

Ajahn Poh (Bodhi Buddhadhammo) and Ajahn Runjuan Inddrakamhaeng of Suan Mokkh have nurtured and guided the environment wherein these lectures and this book have arisen.

 

Ajahn Buddhadasa, in line with the Blessed One's purpose, gives us the example and inspiration for a life of Dhamma service, which we humbly try to emulate in ways such as putting together this manual.

 

Lastly, Mrs. Pratum Juanwiwat supplies much of the friendship and material support (paper, pens, photo-copying, medicine, food)  needed to keep the translator's life and work rolling.

 

Phra Dusadee Metamkuro

Suan Mokkhabalarama

Chaiya, Surat Thani, Thailand

Twelfth Lunar Month 2530 (1987)

 

____________________

 

 

TEXTUAL NOTES  

 

PALI TERMS: Ajahn Buddhadasa feels that committed students of Dhamma should become familiar with and deepen their understanding of important Pali terms. Translations often miss some or much, of the original meaning (e.g. dukkha). By learning the Pali terms, we can explore the various meanings and connotations that arise in different contexts. Here, you will find them explained and sometimes translated (although not always in the same way) both in the text and in the glossary.

 

Pali has both singular and plural inflections but Thai does not. The Pali-Thai terms herein are used like the English "sheep'', sometimes with an article and sometimes not. Depending on the context and meaning, you can decide which cases are appropriate: singular, plural, both, or numberless.

 

Generally, Pali terms are italicized. A few of the more frequent and important terms, especially those that are difficult or cumbersome to translate, are not italicized. These are words which fill gaps in the English language, so we offer them as additions to English dictionaries. Some of these words are Buddha, Dhamma, Sangha, Anapanasati, dhamma, and dukkha.

 

Pali and Thai scripts do not use capital letters. In general, we only capitalize Pali terms when they begin a sentence. The exceptions are some of the non-italicized words.

 

NUMBERING: The Thai and English versions of this work are being published almost simultaneously. To enable easy reference between the two, and with the original tapes, we have numbered each spoken passage. In the original, Ajahn Buddhadasa sometimes spoke only a sentence or two then paused for the interpreter. Other times, he spoke at length before giving the interpreter a chance. Each of these passages is given its own number. When these passages are referred to in the text, they are designated with a capital "P." (Page references use a lower-case "p"). Appendices A, S, and C are numbered in the same way, but do not correspond to the tapes ex­actly, because some passages have been left out. Appendix D is numbered although it differs greatly from the tape and is not in­cluded in the Thai version.

 

FOOTNOTES: All have been added by the translator.

 

 

____________________
 
 
 
 
Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
28 Tháng Hai 2020(Xem: 1019)
02 Tháng Bảy 201911:36 SA(Xem: 1751)
Đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma (được dịch là "Trí Tuệ Như Biển") đời thứ 14, sinh ngày 6/7/1935, tên ngài lúc mới sinh là Lhamo Thondup. The 14th Dalai Lama (loosely translated "Ocean of Wisdom") was born Lhamo Thondup on July 6, 1935.
07 Tháng Bảy 202010:00 CH(Xem: 57)
Trong thế giới chúng ta sống hôm nay, các quốc gia không còn cô lập và tự cung cấp như xưa kia. Tất cả chúng ta trở nên phụ thuộc nhau nhiều hơn. Vì thế, càng phải nhận thức nhiều hơn về tính nhân loại đồng nhất. Việc quan tâm đến người khác là quan tâm chính mình. Khí hậu thay đổi và đại dịch hiện nay, tất cả chúng ta bị đe doạ,
05 Tháng Bảy 20208:28 CH(Xem: 135)
Tâm biết có hai phương diện: Tánh biết và tướng biết. Tánh biết vốn không sinh diệt, còn tướng biết tuỳ đối tượng mà có sinh diệt. Khi khởi tâm muốn biết tức đã rơi vào tướng biết sinh diệt. Khi tâm rỗng lặng hồn nhiên, tướng biết không dao động thì tánh biết tự soi sáng. Lúc đó tánh biết và tướng biết tương thông,
04 Tháng Bảy 20202:37 CH(Xem: 139)
Từ yoniso nghĩa là sáng suốt, đúng đắn. Manasikāra nghĩa là sự chú ý. Khi nào chú ý đúng đắn hợp với chánh đạo, đó là như lý tác ý; khi nào chú ý không đúng đắn, hợp với tà đạo, đó là phi như lý tác ý. Khi chú ý đến các pháp khiến cho năm triền cái phát sanh là phi như lý tác ý, trái lại khi chú ý đến các pháp mà làm hiện khởi
03 Tháng Bảy 20207:32 CH(Xem: 149)
Trước hết cần xác định “tác ý” được dịch từ manasikāra hay từ cetanā, vì đôi lúc cả hai thuật ngữ Pāli này đều được dịch là tác ý như nhau. Khi nói “như lý tác ý” hoặc “phi như tác ý” thì biết đó là manasikāra, còn khi nói “tác ý thiện” hoặc “tác ý bất thiện” thì đó là cetanā. Nếu nghi ngờ một thuật ngữ Phật học Hán Việt thì nên tra lại
02 Tháng Bảy 20206:13 CH(Xem: 178)
Bạn nói là bạn quá bận rộn để thực tập thiền. Bạn có thời gian để thở không? Thiền chính là hơi thở. Tại sao bạn có thì giờ để thở mà lại không có thì giờ để thiền? Hơi thở là thiết yếu cho đời sống. Nếu bạn thấy rằng tu tập Phật pháp là thiết yếu trong cuộc đời, bạn sẽ thấy hơi thởtu tập Phật pháp là quan trọng như nhau.
01 Tháng Bảy 20205:53 CH(Xem: 196)
Khi con biết chiêm nghiệm những trải nghiệm cuộc sống, con sẽ thấy ra ý nghĩa đích thực của khổ đau và ràng buộc thì con sẽ có thể dễ dàng tự do tự tại trong đó. Thực ra khổ đau và ràng buộc chỉ xuất phát từ thái độ của tâm con hơn là từ điều kiện bên ngoài. Nếu con tìm thấy nguyên nhân sinh khổ đau ràng buộc ở trong thái độ tâm
30 Tháng Sáu 20209:07 CH(Xem: 191)
Cốt lõi của đạo Phật khác với các tôn giáo khác ở chỗ, hầu hết các tôn giáo khác đều đưa ra mục đích rồi rèn luyện hay tu luyện để trở thành, để đạt được lý tưởng nào đó. Còn đạo Phật không tu luyện để đạt được cái gì cả. Mục đích của đạo Phậtgiác ngộ, thấy ra sự thật hiện tiền tức cái đang là. Tất cả sự thật đều bình đẳng,
29 Tháng Sáu 20208:36 CH(Xem: 185)
Theo nguyên lý thì tụng gì không thành vấn đề, miễn khi tụng tập trung được tâm ý thì đều có năng lực. Sự tập trung này phần lớn có được nhờ đức tin vào tha lực. Luyện bùa, trì Chú, thôi miên, niệm Phật, niệm Chúa, thiền định, thần thông v.v… cũng đều cần có sức mạnh tập trung mới thành tựu. Tưởng đó là nhờ tha lực nhưng sức mạnh
28 Tháng Sáu 20209:36 CH(Xem: 190)
Giác ngộvô minh thì thấy vô minh, minh thì thấy minh… mỗi mỗi đều là những cái biểu hiện để giúp tâm thấy ra tất cả vốn đã hoàn hảo ngay trong chính nó. Cho nên chỉ cần sống bình thường và thấy ra nguyên lý của Pháp thôi. Sự vận hành của Pháp vốn rất hoàn hảo trong những cặp đối đãi – tương sinh tương khắc – của nó.
27 Tháng Sáu 20206:31 CH(Xem: 203)
Thầy có ví dụ: Trong vườn, cây quýt nhìn qua thấy cây cam nói nói tại sao trái cam to hơn mình. Và nó ước gì nó thành cây cam rồi nó quên hút nước và chết. Mình thường hay muốn thành cái khác, đó là cái sai. Thứ hai là mình muốn đốt thời gian. Như cây ổi, mình cứ lo tưới nước đi. Mọi chuyện hãy để Pháp làm. Mình thận trọng,
26 Tháng Sáu 20209:57 CH(Xem: 181)
Từ đó tôi mới hiểu ý-nghĩa này. Hóa ra trong kinh có nói những cái nghĩa đen, những cái nghĩa bóng. Có nghĩa là khi một người được sinh ra trên thế-gian này, dù người đó là Phật, là phàm-phu, là thánh-nhân đi nữa, ít nhất đầu tiên chúng ta cũng bị tắm bởi hai dòng nước, lạnh và nóng, tức là Nghịch và Thuận; nếu qua được
25 Tháng Sáu 202010:14 CH(Xem: 223)
trí nhớ là tốt nhưng đôi khi nhớ quá nhiều chữ nghĩa cũng không hay ho gì, nên quên bớt ngôn từ đi, chỉ cần nắm được (thấy ra, thực chứng) cốt lõi lý và sự thôi lại càng tốt. Thấy ra cốt lõi tinh tuý của sự thật mới có sự sáng tạo. Nếu nhớ từng lời từng chữ - tầm chương trích cú - như mọt sách rồi nhìn mọi sự mọi vật qua lăng kính
24 Tháng Sáu 202010:08 CH(Xem: 230)
Kính thưa Thầy, là một người Phật Tử, mỗi khi đi làm phước hay dâng cúng một lễ vật gì đến Chư Tăng thì mình có nên cầu nguyện để mong được như ý mà mình mong muốn không? Hay là để tâm trong sạch cung kính mà dâng cúng không nên cầu nguyện một điều gì? Và khi làm phước mà mong được gieo giống lành đắc Đạo quả
23 Tháng Sáu 20207:24 CH(Xem: 265)
Tất cả chúng ta sẽ phải đối mặt với cái chết, vì vậy, không nên bỏ mặc nó. Việc có cái nhìn thực tế về cái chết của mình sẽ giúp ta sống một đời trọn vẹn, có ý nghĩa. Thay vì hấp hối trong sự sợ hãi thì ta có thể chết một cách hạnh phúc, vì đã tận dụng tối đa cuộc sống của mình. Qua nhiều năm thì cơ thể của chúng ta đã thay đổi.
22 Tháng Sáu 20209:23 CH(Xem: 281)
Đúng là không nên nhầm lẫn giữa luân hồi (saṃsāra) và tái sinh (nibbatti). Tái sinh là sự vận hành tự nhiên của vạn vật (pháp hữu vi), đó là sự chết đi và sinh lại. Phàm cái gì do duyên sinh thì cũng đều do duyên diệt, và rồi sẽ tái sinh theo duyên kế tục, như ví dụ trong câu hỏi là ngọn lửa từ bật lửa chuyển thành ngọn lửa
21 Tháng Sáu 20208:58 CH(Xem: 250)
Trong Tăng chi bộ, có một lời kinh về bản chất chân thật của tâm: “Tâm này, này các Tỷ-kheo, là sáng chói, nhưng bị ô nhiễm bởi các cấu uế từ ngoài vào” cùng với ý nghĩa “cội nguồn” của “yoni” trong “yoniso mananikara” là hai y cứ cho tựa sách “Chói sáng cội nguồn tâm”. Tựa đề phụ “Cách nhìn toàn diện hai chiều vô vihữu vi của thực tại”
20 Tháng Sáu 20203:42 CH(Xem: 322)
Trong tu tập nhiều hành giả thường cố gắng sắp đặt cái gì đó trước cho việc hành trì của mình, như phải ngồi thế này, giữ Tâm thế kia, để mong đạt được thế nọ… nhưng thật ra không phải như vậy, mà là cứ sống bình thường trong đời sống hàng ngày, ngay đó biết quan sát mà thấy ra và học cách hành xử sao cho đúng tốt là được.
19 Tháng Sáu 20204:48 CH(Xem: 317)
Lúc còn nhỏ, khi đến thiền viện, tôi phải có cha mẹ đi cùng, và không được đi hay ngồi chung với các sư. Khi các sư giảng Pháp, tôi luôn ngồi bên dưới, chỉ đủ tầm để nghe. Vị thiền sư đáng kính dạy chúng tôi cách đảnh lễ Đức Phậttụng kinh xưng tán ân đức của Ngài. Thiền sư khuyến khích chúng tôi rải tâm từ cho mọi chúng sinh,
18 Tháng Sáu 202010:08 CH(Xem: 264)
Nhiều người thường thắc mắc làm thế nào để thực tập thiền trong đời sống hàng ngày. Tham gia một khóa thiền và thực tập nghiêm túc là sự rèn luyện tích cực trong môi trường đặc biệt. Đây là một việc hữu ích và quan trọng, nhưng việc thực tập thực sự - nếu thiền có một giá trị thực sự nào đó - phải là trong cuộc sống hàng ngày
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 1255)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 2836)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 4349)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
12 Tháng Sáu 20205:26 CH(Xem: 418)
I am very impressed by the thoroughness and care with which Dr. Thynn Thynn explains the path of mindfulness in daily life in her book. This has not been emphasized as strongly in the monastic and meditative teachings of Buddhism that have taken root in the West.
11 Tháng Sáu 20205:08 CH(Xem: 422)
Tôi rất cảm phục Bs Thynn Thynn khi bà đã tận tình giải thích thấu đáo, trong quyển sách của bà, về cách sống tỉnh giác trong đời sống thường ngày. Trước đây, điểm nầy chưa được nhấn mạnh đúng mức trong giáo lý Phật-đà tại các thiền việntu việnTây phương. Trong thực tế, phần lớn các phương pháp tu hành ở Á châu đều theo
14 Tháng Năm 202010:20 CH(Xem: 619)
Trong mấy năm qua, một vài ông bà — cụ thể là Mary Talbot, Jane Yudelman, Bok Lim Kim và Larry Rosenberg—đã đề nghị tôi “Khi nào Sư sẽ viết hướng dẫn về hành thiền hơi thở?” Tôi đã luôn nói với họ rằng cuốn Giữ Hơi Thở Trong Tâm (Keeping the Breath in Mind) của Ajaan Lee là hướng dẫn thực hành tuyệt vời, nhưng họ
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 621)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng
08 Tháng Năm 202010:32 CH(Xem: 621)
"Này Rahula, cũng tương tự như vậy, bất kỳ ai dù không cảm thấy xấu hổ khi cố tình nói dối, thì điều đó cũng không có nghĩa là không làm một điều xấu xa. Ta bảo với con rằng người ấy [dù không xấu hổ đi nữa nhưng cũng không phải vì thế mà] không tạo ra một điều xấu xa.
28 Tháng Tư 202010:41 CH(Xem: 733)
Kinh Thừa Tự Pháp (Dhammadāyāda Sutta) là một lời dạy hết sức quan trọng của Đức Phật đáng được những người có lòng tôn trọng Phật Pháp lưu tâm một cách nghiêm túc. Vì cốt lõi của bài kinh Đức Phật khuyên các đệ tử của ngài nên tránh theo đuổi tài sản vật chất và hãy tìm kiếm sự thừa tự pháp qua việc thực hành Bát Chánh Đạo.
04 Tháng Ba 20209:20 CH(Xem: 1055)
Chàng kia nuôi một bầy dê. Đúng theo phương pháp, tay nghề giỏi giang. Nên dê sinh sản từng đàn. Từ ngàn con đến chục ngàn rất mau. Nhưng chàng hà tiện hàng đầu. Không hề dám giết con nào để ăn. Hoặc là đãi khách đến thăm. Dù ai năn nỉ cũng bằng thừa thôi
11 Tháng Hai 20206:36 SA(Xem: 1263)
Kinh Thập Thiện là một quyển kinh nhỏ ghi lại buổi thuyết pháp của Phật cho cả cư sĩ lẫn người xuất gia, hoặc cho các loài thủy tộc nhẫn đến bậc A-la-hán và Bồ-tát. Xét hội chúng dự buổi thuyết pháp này, chúng ta nhận định được giá trị quyển kinh thế nào rồi. Pháp Thập thiện là nền tảng đạo đức, cũng là nấc thang đầu
09 Tháng Hai 20204:17 CH(Xem: 1136)
Quyển “Kinh Bốn Mươi Hai Chương Giảng Giải” được hình thành qua hai năm ghi chép, phiên tả với lòng chân thành muốn phổ biến những lời Phật dạy. Đầu tiên đây là những buổi học dành cho nội chúng Tu viện Lộc Uyển, sau đó lan dần đến những cư sĩ hữu duyên.