03. LECTURE THREE: CALMING THE KAYA

18 Tháng Ba 202010:29 SA(Xem: 754)
03. LECTURE THREE: CALMING THE KAYA


GiacNiemVeHoiTho_BMindfulness With Breathing - ­Giác Niệm Về Hơi Thở

Bhikkhu Buddhadasa

Translated from the Thai by Santikaro Bhikkhu

Thiện Nhựt phỏng dịch

Source-Nguồn: dhammatalks.net, ftp.budaedu.org, budsas.org, thuvienhoasen.org

 

____________________


LECTURE THREE: CALMING THE KAYA   

 

Today, we will speak about steps three and four of the first tetrad, that is, the remaining steps concerned with the kaya (body). (68) 

 

STEP THREE: EXPERIENCING ALL BODIES 

 

In step three, the aim is to experience all kaya, all bodies. The essence of this step is to feel all bodies while breathing in and breathing out. We already began to observe while practicing the beginning steps that the breath is the conditioner of our flesh-and-blood bodies. This step does not involve anything new, we merely note more this fact more profoundly, clearly, and carefully than earlier. We contemplate more distinctly the fact that there are two kaya (bodies). Continuously observe this while breathing in and breathing out. (69) 

 

The practitioner must recollect an observation that we began to experience previously. Recall the fact that the breath is the conditioner of the flesh-body. We will distinguish between two things,    but we will call both of them kaya (body). The breath is a body in that it is a group or collection. The flesh-body is a kaya because it is a group or collection, also. There are these two groups or bodies. One group is the breath that conditions the flesh-body group. Analyze this experience to see distinctly that there are two groups. And see how they condition each other. Contemplate this more and, more emphatically until it is obvious. (70) 

 

When you hear the word "body," please understand that it in­cludes the meaning of the word "group." In the original Pali language the Lord Buddha used this word "kaya": "sabbakayamipatisamveti (experiencing all bodies)." In Thai, kaya comes from the Pali kaya and can mean "group, pile, heap, division," also. This word does not apply to our physical human forms exclusively, but can apply to other things as well. For instance, in Pali the word for a squad of soldiers is kaya, kaya of soldiers. Kaya means "group, heap, collection"; please do not understand it in terms of flesh-bodies only. The breath is called "kaya" or group, also. To understand what "experiencing all bodies" means we must have the correct understanding of this word "kaya" Then we can know about both groups, the breath group and the flesh body group. (71) 

 

The specific aim of this step is that we must know that there are two groups and that one group conditions, nourishes, and sup­ports the other group. The breath group nourishes the body group. Actually, we have experienced this since the beginning of Anapanasati practice. Earlier, we experienced that when the breath is coarse the flesh-body gets aggravated and when the breath is fine the body calms down. We have observed these facts since practicing steps one and two. In this step, we emphasize this secret until it becomes absolutely clear. There are two groups. One of them con­ditions and nourishes the other. Know the difference between them. (72) 

 

THE THREE MEANINGS OF SANKHARA 

 

We are making the inner, mental experience that these bodies condition each other in this way. The body which is the causal conditioner is given the name kaya-sankhara (body conditioner) to distinguish it from the other, the one effected by the conditioning, the “conditioned body." Work on this fact in the mind, seeing it as if it were physically tangible. See the one group condition and nurture the other. See them arise together, fall together, coarsen together, become fine together, grow comfortable together, and become uncomfortable together. Realize how intimately they are connected.

 

This is what is meant by "seeing all bodies," Watch both bodies together and see them condition each other. This is valuable for seeing truth more extensively, for realizing anatta, even. In seeing this interrelationship, we see that what occurs is merely a natural process of conditioning. There is no atta, no self, no soul, no such thing at all involved. Such understanding can have the highest benefit, although it may be somewhat beyond the specific object of this step. For now, however, we only need to understand this fact of conditioning enough to be able to regulate the flesh-body, to calm it by regulating the breath-body. (73)         

 

I would like to take this opportunity to discuss all the meanings of the term "sankhara." This is a very common and important word in the Pali scriptures, but many people have problems with it due to its different uses and meanings. Languages are like that, uncertain and seemingly unreliable. The single word "sankhara" can mean "conditioner," the cause that conditions; it can mean "condition," the result of the action of conditioning; and it can mean "'conditioning," the activity or process of conditioning. We use the same word for the subject of the conditioning, "the concocter," as well as the object, "the concoction." We even use it for the activity, "the concocting," itself. This may be a bit confusing for you, so please remember that "sankhara" has three meanings. The correct meaning depends on the context. This knowledge will be valuable in your further studies. (74) 

 

Study the three meanings of sankhara in this body of ours. There is no need to study it in books or in a theoretical way. The body itself is a sankhara. It has been conditioned by a variety of causes and by the many things of which it is formed. Thus, it is a sankhara in the meaning of "condition." Once this body exists, it causes the arising of other things, such as thoughts, feelings, and actions. Without the body these thoughts and actions could never happen. Thus, it is a "conditioner" because it causes other actions. Lastly, in this flesh-body sankhara of ours, there is the process of conditioning going on constantly. We can discover all three aspects of the word sankhara within this very body. Study the meaning of sankhara in this comprehensive way. Then you will find it easy and convenient to realize more and more profound Dhamma as you go on. (75)

 

EXPERIENCING SANKHARA 

 

In step three - "experiencing all bodies," experiencing both the breath and this flesh-body - each of these three meanings is practiced. First, we contemplate the flesh-body as the thing conditioned by the breath. Then, we see the breath as the conditioner of the flesh-body. Lastly, we observe the activity of conditioning that always exists simultaneously between the two of them. Thus, in the practice of step three we see the conditioner, the condition, and the action of conditioning. This conditioning of the body is the physical level of sankhara. We have not yet seen it on the mental level. Step three is this work of seeing these three things together, simultaneously and continuously, within the mind. Then, you will see everything concerning the term "sankhara," especially as it relates to the kaya and its activity, right here in step three. (76) 

 

When we have studied this fact until it is plainly, obviously, and universally understood as explained above, then we will be able to experience all three of these facts together in one moment. Even for the duration of just one in-breath, or for just one out-breath, we can experience all three facts in just one stroke of the breath. If we are able to do so, then we have "fully experienced the kaya-sankhara (body-conditioner)" and step three is successfully completed. (77) 

 

The essence of practicing step three is to know that there are two kaya, and to be able to regulate one kaya through the other kaya. That is, we can regulate the flesh-body through the breath-body. Once we are certain or this, once we see it dearly, once we are convinced by our experience of this fact with each in-breath and out-breath, then we have realized success in our practice of step three. (78) 

 

STEP FOUR: CALMING THE BREATH 

 

After we know that we can regulate the flesh-body with the breath-body, we begin to practice step four. The Lord Buddha described step four as "calming the body-conditioner (passambhayam kayasankharam)." We are able to do this once we know that we can use the breath-body to control the flesh-body. (79) 

 

The subject of step four is to calm the body-conditioner (kaya-sankhara) while breathing in and calm the body-conditioner while breathing out. This means we can make the body-conditioner. (breath) calmer and calmer at the same time that we inhale and exhale. This is the matter which we now will explain. (80) 

 

Note the specific wording of this step. "Calming the body­-conditioner" refers to calming the breath-body. In step four, the aim of our practice is to calm the breath. We make it fine and peaceful using various techniques which are available to us. If we can calm the breath, there will be very interesting and powerful results. First of all, the flesh-body will become very gentle, relaxed, and tranquil. Then there will arise a calming of the mind, also. There will be other results as well, but they will be left alone until later. The immediate lesson is to calm the breath. To mange the breath is the first point to be considered in the practice of step four. (81) 

 

FIVE SKILLFUL TRICKS 

 

In practicing step four, we have various methods or skillful means - we could even call them tricks - to use in calming the breath. Whether we call them techniques or tricks, these are a higher order of things which we use over things that are more crude and foolish. We call them "skillful means." We have some tricks to use on the breath and these tricks come in five stages. These five tricks or skillful means are: 

 

1. following the breath;

 

2. guarding the breath at a certain point;

 

3. giving rise to an imaginary image at that guarding point;

 

4. manipulating those images in any ways that we want in order to gain power over them;  

 

5. selecting one of these images and contemplating it in a most concentrated way until the breath becomes truly calm and peaceful.

 

These are our five techniques or tricks: following, guarding, raising a mental image, playing with the different mental images, and choosing one image to be the specific object of samadhi (concentration, collectedness) up until there is complete calmness. (82) 

 

As for the first stage - following or chasing - we have been doing this from the start. With the long and short breaths we must use hunting or following. Now, we merely repeat or review it until we are most expert at following the breath. This does not require fur­ther explanation. We have already done plenty of it in steps one, two, and three.  

 

The second trick is guarding, to choose one point along the breath's path and to watch or guard the breath there. We do not need to follow the breath anymore, but the results are as if we con­tinued to do so. This citta, this sati, is no allowed to go anywhere; it must stay only at that point. It guards the breath passing in and passing out, which give results equal to following, except that guarding is more subtle. 

 

Generally, we use the furthest point in the nose where the breath makes contact, which is usually at the tip. That point is the easiest and most simple to guard, unless you have a hooked nose that comes down low and a high upper lip. Then you might feel the breath’s touch just above the upper lip. For each of us the point will be in a different place, depending on the shape and structure of each nose and lip. 

 

Find the place where it is easiest to observe the breath. If it is difficult to find while breathing normally, take a few deep, strong breath it will become obvious. The exact location is not impor­tant, only find that point in your nose, or even on the upper lip, where you feel the breath most clearly. Once you find it, guard that point as the breath passes in and out. The mind, sati, stays right at point and contemplates the breath as it goes in and out. Just breathing in and breathing out with the mind guarding at that point: this is stage two in our series of tricks. (83) 

 

You can observe for yourself that when we do not bother to note the breath and just let it go as it pleases, it will have a certain feel. As soon as we begin to note it, even when merely following it, it becomes finer and more gentle. It adjusts itself and becomes more subtle in order to deceive us. It plays tricks like this. Then, when we stop chasing and start to guard the breath at a specific point in the nose, the breath calms down even more. You can verify this fact in your own experience. 

 

A MENTAL IMAGE APPEARS 

 

Now, the breath refines and calms further when we create a mental image (nimitta) at the guarding point. This mental image is only imaginary, it is not real. It is created by the citta, it is mind­-made. You can close the eyes and "see" it, you can open the eyes and you still "see" it. It is like a hallucination that the mind creates by itself to calm the breath. To do so, the mind must be subtle. The breath, everything, must be refined in order to raise a mental image. The breath must become finer and calmer until the image is created. 

 

The mental image can be any kind of shape or form depending on what is appropriate for the body of each person. Some people might create a sphere - red, white, green, or any color. It could be a candle flame, for instance, or a puff of cotton, or a wisp of smoke. It can look like the sun, or the moon, or a star. Even the im­age of a spider's web glimmering in the sunlight is within the abilities­ of the mind's creative powers. The kind of image depends on the one who creates it. The mind merely inclines in a certain way and the image arises by itself. It is a purely mental phenomenon that has no physical reality. The third trick is complete when we are able to create a mental image at the guarding point. (84) 

 

Now it is time for trick number four. This trick is to change or manipulate the images according to our requirements. Change them from this image to that. Change them in this way, in that way, in all the ways that we wish. This all is possible because the mind creates the images in the first place. Thus, it has the ability to change them, to manipulate them, to play with them. This all can be done easily, it is well within the mind's capabilities. And at the same time, it develops our ability to master the mind in increasingly subtle and powerful ways. 

 

We can control the mind more than we could before and this citta automatically grows more subtle and refined by itself. It calms down until eventually we will be able to calm it completely. Now we merely control these images, changing them according to the mind's tendencies. Depending on how the mind inclines, we experiment with changing the images in order to calm the breath more and more. This is nothing more than a trick. Still, it is a more ad­vanced trick which enables us to have greater influence over the mind. Then, the breath calms down automatically. The breath must become calmer for us to manipulate the images. Although the mind calms down as well, the emphasis now is on calming the breath. The fourth trick is controlling the mental images as we wish.  (85) 

 

THE FINAL IMAGE 

 

If we want to observe the process, or the order, of calming, we must watch and see that when we train in the way described here, the breath refines and calms down automatically in itself. When we practice in this way the breath will become calm. When the breath calms, the flesh-body automatically will calm down accordingly. Now when the body calms there is an effect upon the mind. The citta calms in proportion to the calming of the body, but this is not our intention at this point. The calming of the mind is the aim of a later step. Calm the breath and the body calms. In addition, there will be certain effects upon the mind. We can observe the calming process while we practice this step.   (86) 

 

The fifth trick is choosing the one single most appropriate nimitta (image). We will not change it any more. We will choose the one image that is most fitting and proper, then will contemplate it with our full attention in order to develop a complete measure of samadhi (concentration). We advise that you choose an image that is soothing, relaxing, and easy to focus upon. Choose one that does not stir up thoughts and emotions: one that does not develop any special significance or meaning. A mere white point or dot will do fine. 

 

The best kind of image is neutral. If we choose a colored one it will brew up thoughts and feelings. The same holds for attractive, interesting, fancy, or complicated images. Some people like to use a picture of the Buddha as their nimitta, but that can get carried away in all kinds of thinking. The thoughts merely follow the picture that is seen, rather than plumbing down into stillness. Therefore, we take an image that has no meaning, has no mental associations, and natural. A white spot is most proper. A tiny spot of light is also fitting. Some people will prefer a Buddha image or whatever suits their fancy. We do not. We take a spot that is easy to contemplate and does not stir up any thoughts. We choose such an image and focus all of the mind on it, in order to develop a concentrated mind. Focus on just this simple point. None of the citta wanders anywhere else. It all gathers together on this single spot. Concentrating everything on this one point is the fifth trick. (87) 

 

PERFECT CONCENTRATION 

 

So it is that we select the one object (nimitta) which is the most appropriate for the mind to contemplate. At this point, we need know that ordinarily the mind is scattering, spreading, and radiating outward in all directions. Now, we must turn inward onto one focus,  all of that outward flowing. In Pali this state is called "ekaggata," which means "to have a single peak, focus, or apex." Everything gathers together at this single focus. We have found the image that is most appropriate - a tiny central point -- now the mind plunges into it. The mental flow is collected at this point in the same way that a magnifying glass collects the sun's rays and focuses them into a single point powerful enough to ignite a flame. This example illustrates the power that is harnessed when all of the mind's energy is gathered into one point. Once the mind focuses upon the object we have chosen, its radiance gathers there and becomes ekaggata - one-pointed, one-peaked, one-pinnacled. (88) 

 

When the mind is one-pointed, there are no other feelings, thoughts, or objects of that mind. There remain only the things called jhananga (factors of jhana*). At the first level of one-pointed­ness there are five factors. At this level the mind is still coarse enough to perform the function of contemplating the object. The mind noting its object is called vitakka. The mind experiencing that object is, called vicara. Due to vitakka and vicara the mind is satisfied or contented (piti). And once there is piti, there is the feel­ing of joy (sukha) at the same instant. Lastly, one-pointedness of mind continues as before. Thus, the mind on this level of samadhi (concentration) has five factors: noting (vitakka), experiencing (vicara), contentment (piti), joy (sukha), and one-pointedness (ekaggata). These five show that the mind has entered the first level of perfect samadhi. This kind of awareness does not include any kind of think­ing, yet these five activities of the mind occur. We call them factors of jhana. If we can identify that all are present, then we can be satisfied with experiencing success in having perfect samadhi, although only the first. That sounds strange - perfect, but only the first stage. (89) 

 

[* Jhana means "to gaze, to focus" but the exact significance varies with the context. Here it signifies a high level of samadhi often translated "absorption."]  

 

AT THE PEAK 

 

I would like to take a closer look at the word "ekaggata." This word is commonly translated "one-pointedness." Literally, the Pali term means "to have one single (eka) peak (agga; Thai, yod).The Thai word "yod" (rhymes with "laud") can mean either the very top, peak, apex, or pinnacle of something, such as a mountain or a pyramid; or the new tip or growing point of a plant. I am not sure that the English "point" has the same meaning. A point can be anywhere. It can be off to the side somewhere or even down very low. This is why the Pali uses the word agga (peak, summit, or zenith). Ekaggata is like being the apex of a pyramid. It would not be proper for such a mind to be at some low point. This mind must be on a high level. It is gathered together up from low levels to one high point or peak. This is the proper meaning of ekaggata. 

 

Do not worry, however, should the mind collect itself on a focus that may not be the highest. That is a start anyway. Whenever there is ekaggata, it is the beginning of something most useful. Whenever there is some ekaggata, then there is samadhi. In our practice of step four of Anapanasati, it is not necessary to try to enter jhana completely. In the practice of Anapanasati those very refined levels of concentration are not necessary. We only need to have a sufficient and appropriate level of concentration to continue with our practice, that is, enough samadhi that there are the feelings of  piti and sukha (contentment and happiness). We need to use piti and sukha in the next steps of our study. If you can go on into jhana, into the material absorptions (rupa-jhana), that will be useful. It will make the next steps easier. Even if you do not reach jhana, as long as there is some piti and sukha you are doing fine. Now that will not be too difficult, will it? 

 

When the feelings piti and sukha are strong enough for the mind to feel them clearly, this is sufficient concentration to be able to go on to step five. If you enter the first, second, third, and fourth rupa-jhana that is more splendid yet. But samadhi sufficient to experience piti and sukha distinctly is enough for step four. (90) 

 

IT'S EASY WHEN…

 

Some of you may be wondering whether this will be difficult or easy to do. That is something we cannot tell you. But we can say that it will not be difficult if the method is practiced correctly. If you have been listening carefully, then you will understand the proper way to do this practice. If you follow the technique correctly, it will not be very difficult. You might even finish in a short time. If you do not practice according to the method, then it may be very difficult. You might never finish. It could take three days for some, three weeks for others, three months for some, or even three years. Who can say? 

 

Most of you are still at the beginning, working on step one, but that does not mean you need not pay attention to the instructions about step four. If you do not know what to do, then it will be very difficult for you to do it when the time comes. We are giving instruc­tions as clearly as we can, that you will understand the proper way to do this practice. Many people, however, do not like to follow in­structions. They prefer to mix everything up with their own ideas and opinions. They like to make a hodge-podge out of things they read and hear from different places. You can do what you wish. But if you want to make this practice as successful and easy for yourself as possible, then we recommend that you follow these instructions that explain the most proper, efficient, and successful way to do this technique. 

 

Practicing according to the method is not difficult. Not following the technique brings many difficulties. Therefore, we must try to learn the correct method and how to apply it. Then, we will achieve the expected results. Beyond that, there is nothing else to do except repeat and repeat and repeat these steps until we are expert. Repeat them until we can very quickly calm the breath and calm the body. Practice until these steps require no effort. Become well versed in these activities.  

 

And please do not forget! In every step, in every stage and in­terval of the practice, we must note the breathing in and breathing out. This is the background and foundation of our sati. This is how to be supremely mindful. Note the inhalations and exhalations at each stage of practice. Then we will meet with success in the first tetrad of Anapanasati. This is the theoretical background of Anapanasati and the principles on which we practice it. 

 

Our time is up. May we end today's lecture now.  (91)  

 

____________________
 
 
 
Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
22 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 923)
19 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 827)
09 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 669)
18 Tháng Chín 202012:37 CH(Xem: 45)
Bởi vì muốn đánh thức thế gian vẫn đang ngủ say quá lâu trong căn phòng tối tăm của vô minh nên tác giả đã đặt tựa đề của quyển sách này là “Thức Tỉnh Đi, Thế Gian Ơi!”. Khởi đầu của vòng luân hồi (saṃsāra) là không thể tìm ra. Điểm đầu tiên thì không thấy được và không thể nhận biết. Tất cả chúng ta đang đi lang thang và thơ thẩn
17 Tháng Chín 20207:54 CH(Xem: 62)
HỎI: Làm phước cách nào mới gọi là đại thí? - ĐÁP: Không hẳn bỏ ra nhiều mới là đại thí, mà đại thí ở đây có nghĩa là: 1. Tâm mình lúc bỏ ra hoàn toàn không có sự nuối tiếc. 2. Đối tượng nhận sự cúng dường, sự bố thí đó nếu là đối tượng cá nhân phải là đức độ, hoặc là đối tượng tập thể. 3. Tác dụng của vật thí đó, thí dụ như mình
16 Tháng Chín 20208:41 CH(Xem: 95)
Từ năm 1951 Ngài Thiền Sư U Pandita đã dạy hằng ngàn thiền sinh và châu du hoằng pháp, hướng dẫn những khóa thiền trong nhiều quốc gia Á Đông cũng như ở Âu châu, Úc châu và Hoa Kỳ. Hiện nay Ngài là Tăng Trưởng Thiền Viện Panditarama tại Rangoon, Miến Điện, nơi đây Ngài dạy những bậc xuất gia và hàng tại gia cư sĩ.
14 Tháng Chín 202010:04 CH(Xem: 114)
As regards the Abhidhamma, this is an exposition of all realities in detail. 'Abhi' literally means 'higher', thus 'Abhidhamma' means 'higher dhamma'. The form of this part of the Tipitaka is different, but the aim is the same: the eradication of wrong view and eventually of all defilements. Thus, when we study the many enumerations of realities,
12 Tháng Chín 20207:06 CH(Xem: 146)
Theo truyền thống của Phật giáo Nguyên thủy thì Tạng Vi Diệu Pháp (A tỳ Đàm) được Đức Phật thuyết vào hạ thứ bảy tại cung trời Đạo lợi (Tàvatimsa) với tác ý trả hiếu cho thân mẫu. Ngày nay chúng ta đến hành hươngẤn độ để chiêm bái bốn chỗ Động tâm: Đản sanh, Thành đạo, Chuyển pháp luân và nơi Phật nhập diệt.
11 Tháng Chín 20207:52 SA(Xem: 164)
Toàn bộ mục đích của việc nghiên cứu Phật Pháp là để tìm con đường giải thoát khổ, đạt đến hạnh phúcbình an. Dù chúng ta nghiên cứu các hiện tượng thân hay tâm, tâm vương (citta) hay tâm sở (cetasikā), chỉ khi lấy sự giải thoát khổ làm mục đích cuối cùng thì chúng ta mới ở trên con đường chánh – không gì khác. Khổ có mặt là
10 Tháng Chín 20208:43 CH(Xem: 160)
Các bạn, những người đi tìm kiếm thiện pháp, tụ hội ở đây ngày hôm nay, xin hãy lắng nghe với sự bình an. Nghe pháp với sự bình an là lắng nghe với sự tập trung, chú ý tới những gì bạn nghe và rồi buông bỏ. Nghe pháplợi ích vô cùng. Khi nghe pháp, chúng ta an trú thân tâm mình trong sự định tĩnh, bởi vì đây cũng chính là
09 Tháng Chín 202010:56 CH(Xem: 161)
Bạn đừng quên rằng việc thực tập không dễ dàng chút nào. Uốn nắn thứ gì khác thật không mấy khó khăn, đôi khi còn dễ dàng nữa là khác, nhưng uốn nắn tâm con người quả thật là thiên nan vạn nan. Đức Thế Tôn đã điều phục tâm của mình một cách viên mãn. Tâm là quan trọng nhất. Mọi bộ phận trong hệ thống thân tâm này
08 Tháng Chín 20205:26 CH(Xem: 212)
Hôm nay đề tài mà tôi muốn nói với các bạn là tỉnh giác hay hiểu biết sáng suốt trong khi ăn. Cơ thể chúng ta cần thức ăn mỗi ngày, bởi vậy hàng ngày chúng ta cần phải ăn để sống. Thức ăn trở thành một nhu cầu thiết yếu và lớn lao của cuộc sống. Chúng ta phải bỏ ra nhiều thì giờ để ăn, nghĩa là phải tốn thì giờ để kiếm thức ăn,
06 Tháng Chín 20207:02 CH(Xem: 251)
Chùa rất đơn sơ, đúng như tinh thần tri-túc-tiện-túc nhưng lại có một bảo vật vô giá mà nơi cất giữ chỉ Sư và bẩy đệ tử biết thôi. Đó là một xâu chuỗi mà tương truyền là Đức Phật Thích Ca Mâu Ni đã từng đeo. Một ngày kia, sau thời công phu tối, Sư vừa băn khoăn, vừa buồn rầu nói với các đệ tử: - Xâu chuỗi không còn đó! Trong các con,
05 Tháng Chín 20209:47 CH(Xem: 302)
Tôi có một đệ tử xuất gia, người tây phương. Hễ mỗi khi thấy các sư hay tập sự người Thái xả y hoàn tục, anh liền nói: “Ồ, thật là xấu hổ làm sao! Tại sao họ lại làm thế chứ? Tại sao có quá nhiều sư và tập sự Thái hoàn tục như thế?” Anh ta cảm thấy sốc. Anh ta buồn khi thấy các sư và tập sự Thái hoàn tục bởi vì anh chỉ mới đến tiếp xúc
04 Tháng Chín 20202:19 CH(Xem: 440)
Ngày 25-9-2019 chùa chúng ta xẩy ra một sự cố, sự cố lớn – đấy là chuyện "có một ông sư" đã cuổm hết tiền của quỹ Tam Bảo, quỹ xây dựng, quỹ sinh hoạt, quỹ du học… để đi đánh bạc (có lẽ) thua sạch. Thế rồi chúng ta phải còng lưng trả những món nợ bên ngoài. Chuyện ấy cũng cần nói rõ ràng ra không cần phải giấu diếm nữa.
03 Tháng Chín 20209:05 CH(Xem: 402)
Một hôm, Đức Phật ngồi trò chuyện cùng các môn đồ của mình. Ngài kể cho họ về chuyện một người đàn ông muốn qua sông song lại bị kẹt lại ở trên bờ. Ở bờ bên này đang có một hiểm nguy lớn đang chờ ông ta. Ở bờ sông bên kia thì rất an toàn. Nhưng chẳng có cây cầu hay chiếc phà nào để qua sông. Vậy phải làm sao?
02 Tháng Chín 20209:24 CH(Xem: 528)
Đây là cuốn sách sọan dịch từ những bài pháp ngắn mà Hòa thượng Sīlānanda đã giảng trong những khóa thiền ngắn ngày, và dài ngày ở nhiều nơi trên thế giới rất hữu ích cho những người mới hành thiền cũng như đã hành thiền lâu ngày. Người mới hành thiền biết hành thiền đúng theo những lời dạy của Đức Phật. Người hành thiền
01 Tháng Chín 20206:32 CH(Xem: 570)
Từ những ngày đầu bước chân vào con đường tu học Phật, tôi đã cảm thấy mạnh mẽ rằng thế nào tôi cũng sẽ tìm được cho mình một lối sống chân thậtan lạc. Vào thời ấy, cuộc sống của tôi bị chi phối bởi nhiều rối rensợ hãi. Tôi cảm thấy xa lạ với tất cả mọi người, với thế giới chung quanh, và ngay cả với những kinh nghiệm
31 Tháng Tám 20209:43 CH(Xem: 460)
Thiền Quán, Con Đường Hạnh Phúc (It's Easier Than You Think) là một quyển sách vui tươi và rất dễ đọc. Tác giả trình bày giáo lý của đức Phậtphương pháp tu tập, bằng các mẩu chuyện về những kinh nghiệm trong cuộc sống hằng ngày của chúng ta. Bà Sylvia Boorstein là một nhà tâm lý trị liệu (psychotherapist) và cũng là một giáo thọ
30 Tháng Tám 202011:15 CH(Xem: 392)
Khi bàn luận một vấn đề cần giải quyết: * Không trách móc phiền hà. * Tuyệt đối không nêu khuyết điểm của người. * Chỉ nêu cái khó chung để cùng giải quyết. * Lắng nghe ý người. Khuyến khích, thừa nhận ý kiến đóng góp của người. * Hướng đến việc giải quyết vấn đề, trước mắt, không nhắc việc bất đồng đã qua. * Để người nói nhiều
29 Tháng Tám 202011:05 SA(Xem: 547)
Tình cờ một quyển sách nằm trong tầm tay. A Glimpse of Nothingness – chợt nhận, thoáng nhận ra Không tính – tên tác giả lạ hoắc, không phải hàng Sư tổ của thiền. Chính vì chỗ này mà cách diễn tả gần gũi. Một tục gia cư sĩ, thương gia người Hà Lan, đi theo con đường của chính mình, tự tìm ra câu giải đáp, cùng với các bạn
28 Tháng Tám 20209:03 CH(Xem: 421)
Thời đức Phật, có ngài Kassapa, mẹ của ngài là một Tỳ-kheo ni. Do bà đi nghe phápphát tâm đi tu. Chồng của bà cũng hoan hỷ để bà đi. Sau khi được nhập vào ni đoàn, thì bụng của bà ngày một lớn lên. Mọi người họp nhau lại và định đuổi bà ra khỏi hội chúng. Bà cảm thấy mình bị oan ức nên mới đến kêu cứu với Phật.
27 Tháng Tám 20202:53 CH(Xem: 536)
Chúng ta tưởng rằng Thiền là một cảnh giới cao siêu khó hiểu, Thiền sư là những bậc đạt đạo thượng thừa, không thể đến gần. Là một người hành thiền ở thế kỷ XX, thiền sư Shunryu Suzuki đã dùng lối nói chuyện giản dị, khai mở phương pháp tu tập hết sức gần gũi, dễ chịu. Ngài đã truyền niềm tin tưởng chắc thật rằng mỗi chúng ta
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 1707)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 3388)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 4911)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
02 Tháng Chín 20209:24 CH(Xem: 528)
Đây là cuốn sách sọan dịch từ những bài pháp ngắn mà Hòa thượng Sīlānanda đã giảng trong những khóa thiền ngắn ngày, và dài ngày ở nhiều nơi trên thế giới rất hữu ích cho những người mới hành thiền cũng như đã hành thiền lâu ngày. Người mới hành thiền biết hành thiền đúng theo những lời dạy của Đức Phật. Người hành thiền
01 Tháng Chín 20206:32 CH(Xem: 570)
Từ những ngày đầu bước chân vào con đường tu học Phật, tôi đã cảm thấy mạnh mẽ rằng thế nào tôi cũng sẽ tìm được cho mình một lối sống chân thậtan lạc. Vào thời ấy, cuộc sống của tôi bị chi phối bởi nhiều rối rensợ hãi. Tôi cảm thấy xa lạ với tất cả mọi người, với thế giới chung quanh, và ngay cả với những kinh nghiệm
31 Tháng Tám 20209:43 CH(Xem: 460)
Thiền Quán, Con Đường Hạnh Phúc (It's Easier Than You Think) là một quyển sách vui tươi và rất dễ đọc. Tác giả trình bày giáo lý của đức Phậtphương pháp tu tập, bằng các mẩu chuyện về những kinh nghiệm trong cuộc sống hằng ngày của chúng ta. Bà Sylvia Boorstein là một nhà tâm lý trị liệu (psychotherapist) và cũng là một giáo thọ
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 1336)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng
08 Tháng Năm 202010:32 CH(Xem: 1271)
"Này Rahula, cũng tương tự như vậy, bất kỳ ai dù không cảm thấy xấu hổ khi cố tình nói dối, thì điều đó cũng không có nghĩa là không làm một điều xấu xa. Ta bảo với con rằng người ấy [dù không xấu hổ đi nữa nhưng cũng không phải vì thế mà] không tạo ra một điều xấu xa.
28 Tháng Tư 202010:41 CH(Xem: 1418)
Kinh Thừa Tự Pháp (Dhammadāyāda Sutta) là một lời dạy hết sức quan trọng của Đức Phật đáng được những người có lòng tôn trọng Phật Pháp lưu tâm một cách nghiêm túc. Vì cốt lõi của bài kinh Đức Phật khuyên các đệ tử của ngài nên tránh theo đuổi tài sản vật chất và hãy tìm kiếm sự thừa tự pháp qua việc thực hành Bát Chánh Đạo.
04 Tháng Ba 20209:20 CH(Xem: 1669)
Chàng kia nuôi một bầy dê. Đúng theo phương pháp, tay nghề giỏi giang. Nên dê sinh sản từng đàn. Từ ngàn con đến chục ngàn rất mau. Nhưng chàng hà tiện hàng đầu. Không hề dám giết con nào để ăn. Hoặc là đãi khách đến thăm. Dù ai năn nỉ cũng bằng thừa thôi
11 Tháng Hai 20206:36 SA(Xem: 1885)
Kinh Thập Thiện là một quyển kinh nhỏ ghi lại buổi thuyết pháp của Phật cho cả cư sĩ lẫn người xuất gia, hoặc cho các loài thủy tộc nhẫn đến bậc A-la-hán và Bồ-tát. Xét hội chúng dự buổi thuyết pháp này, chúng ta nhận định được giá trị quyển kinh thế nào rồi. Pháp Thập thiện là nền tảng đạo đức, cũng là nấc thang đầu
09 Tháng Hai 20204:17 CH(Xem: 1724)
Quyển “Kinh Bốn Mươi Hai Chương Giảng Giải” được hình thành qua hai năm ghi chép, phiên tả với lòng chân thành muốn phổ biến những lời Phật dạy. Đầu tiên đây là những buổi học dành cho nội chúng Tu viện Lộc Uyển, sau đó lan dần đến những cư sĩ hữu duyên.