Chapter 7: Moral Foundation For Mankind

30 Tháng Ba 20209:30 CH(Xem: 2234)
Chapter 7: Moral Foundation For Mankind


WhatBuddhistsBelieve_BWhat Buddhists Believe - Vì Sao Tin Phật

K. Sri Dhammananda

Thích Tâm Quang dịch Việt

Source-Nguồn: budsas.org, buddhanet.net, samanta.vn

 

____________________

-----------------------------

 

 

PART THREE - LEADING A BUDDHIST LIFE

 

  CHAPTER 7 - MORAL FOUNDATION FOR MANKIND

 


 

What is the purpose of life?

 

Man is the highest fruit on the tree of evolution. It is for man to realize his position in nature and understand the true meaning of his life.

 

To know the purpose of life, you will first have to study the subject through your experience and insight. Then, you will discover for yourself the true meaning of life. Guidelines can be given, but you must create the necessary conditions for the arising of realization yourself.

 

There are several prerequisites to the discovery of the purpose of life. First, you must understand the nature of man and the nature of life. Next, you keep your mind calm and peaceful through the adoption of a religion. When these conditions are met, the answer you seek will come like the gentle rain from the sky.

 

Understanding the nature of man

 

Man may be clever enough to land on the moon and discover wondrous things in the universe, but he has yet to delve into the inner workings of his own mind. He has yet to learn how his mind can be developed to its fullest potential so that its true nature can be realized.

 

As yet, man is still wrapped in ignorance. He does not known who he really is or what is expected of him. As a result, he misinterprets everything and acts on that misinterpretation. Is it not conceivable that our entire civilization is built on the misinterpretation? The failure to understand his existence leads him to assume a false identity of a bloated, self-seeking egoist, and to pretend to be what he is not or is unable to be.

 

Man must make an effort to overcome ignorance to arrive at realization and Enlightenment. All great men are born as human beings from the womb, but they worked their way up to greatness. Realization and Enlightenment cannot be poured into the human heart like water into a tank. Even the Buddha had to cultivate His mind to realize the real nature of man.

 

Man can be enlightened _a Buddha?if he wakes up from the 'dream' that is created by his own ignorant mind, and becomes fully awakened. He must realize that what he is today is the result of an untold number of repetitions in thoughts and actions. He is not ready-made: he is continually in the process of becoming, always changing. And it is in this characteristic of change that his future lies, because it means that it is possible for him to mould his character and destiny through the choice of his actions, speech and thoughts. Indeed, he becomes the thoughts and actions that he chooses to perform. Man is the highest fruit on the tree of evolution. It is for man to realize his position in nature and to understand the true meaning of his life.

 

Understanding the nature of life

 

Most people dislike facing the true facts of life and prefer to lull themselves into a false sense of security by sweet dreaming and imagining. They mistake the shadow for the substance. They fail to realize that life is uncertain, but that death is certain. One way of understanding life is to face and understand death which is nothing more than a temporary end to a temporary existence. But many people do not like even to hear of the word 'death'. They forget that death will come, whether they like it or not. Recollections on death with the right mental attitude can give a person courage and calmness as well as an insight into the nature of existence.

 

Besides understanding death, we need a better understanding of our life. We are living a life that does not always proceed as smoothly as we would like it to. Very often, we face problems and difficulties. We should not be afraid of them because the penetration into the very nature of these problems and difficulties can provide us with a deeper insight into life. The worldly happiness in wealth, luxury, respectable positions in life which most people seek is an illusion. The fact that the sale of sleeping pills and tranquilizers, admissions to mental hospital and suicide rates have increased in relation to modern material progress is enough testimony that we have to go beyond worldly, material pleasure to seek for real happiness.

 

The need for a religion

 

To understand the real purpose of life, it is advisable for a person to choose and follow an ethical-moral system that restrains a person from evil deeds, encourages him to do good, and enables him to purify his mind. For simplicity, we shall call this system 'religion'.

 

Religion is the expression of the striving man: it is his greatest power, leading him onwards to self-realization. It has the power to transform one with negative characteristics into someone with positive qualities. It turns the ignoble, noble; the selfish, unselfish; the proud, humble; the haughty, forbearing; the greedy, benevolent; the cruel, kind; the subjective, objective. Every religion, represents, however imperfectly, a reaching upwards to a higher level of being. From the earliest times, religion has been the source of man's artistic and cultural inspiration. Although many forms of religion had come into being in the course of history, only to pass away and be forgotten, each one in its time had contributed something towards the sum of human progress. Christianity helped to civilize the West, and the weakening of its influence has marked a downward trend of the Occidental spirit. Buddhism, which civilized the greater part of the East long before, is still a vital force, and in this age of scientific knowledge is likely to extend and to strengthen its influence. It does not, at any point, come into conflict with modern knowledge, but embraces and transcends all of it in a way that no other system of thought has ever done before or is ever likely to do. Western man seeks to conquer the universe for material ends. Buddhism and Eastern philosophy strive to attain harmony with nature or spiritual satisfaction.

 

Religion teaches a person how to calm down the senses and make the heart and mind peaceful. The secret of calming down the senses is to eliminate desire which is the root of our disturbances. It is very important for us to have contentment. The more people crave for their property, the more they have to suffer. Property does not give happiness to man. Most of the rich people in the world today are suffering from numerous physical and mental problems. With all the money they have, they cannot buy a solution to their problems. Yet, the poorest men who have learnt to have contentment may enjoy their lives far more than the richest people do. As one rhyme goes:

 

'Some have too much and yet do crave
I have little and seek no more;
They are but poor though much more they have
And I am rich with little store.
They poor, I rich, they beg, I give;
They lack, I have; they pine, I live.'

 

Searching for a purpose in life

 

The aim in life varies among individuals. An artist may aim to paint masterpieces that will live long after he is gone. A scientist may want to discover some laws, formulate a new theory, or invent a new machine. A politician may wish to become a prime minister or a president. A young executive may aim to be a managing director of multinational company. However, when you ask the artist, scientist, politician and the young executive why they aim such, they will reply that these achievements will give them a purpose in life and make them happy. Everyone aims for happiness in life, yet experience shows time and again that its attainment is so elusive.

 

Realization

 

Once we realize the nature of life (characterized by unsatisfactoriness, change, and egolessness) as well as the nature of man's greed and the means of getting them satisfied, we can then understand the reason why the happiness so desperately sought by many people is so elusive like catching a moon beam in their hands. They try to gain happiness through accumulation. When they are not successful in accumulating wealth, gaining position, power and honour, and deriving pleasure from sense satisfaction, they pine and suffer, envying others who are successful in doing so. However, even if they are 'successful' in getting these things, they suffer as well because they now fear losing what they have gained, or their desires have now increased for more wealth, higher position, more power, and greater pleasure. Their desires can never seem to be completely satiated. This is why an understanding of life is important so that we do not waste too much time doing the impossible.

 

It is here that the adoption of a religion becomes important, since it encourages contentment and urges a person to look beyond the demands of his flesh and ego. In a religion like Buddhism, a person is reminded that he is the heir of his karma and the master of his destiny. In order to gain greater happiness, he must be prepared to forego sort-term pleasures. If a person does not believe in life after death, even then it is enough for him to lead a good, noble life on earth, enjoying a life of peace and happiness here and now, as well as performing actions which are for the benefit and happiness of others. Leading such a positive and wholesome life on earth and creating happiness for oneself and others is much better than a selfish life of trying to satisfy one's ego and greed.

 

If, however, a person believes in life after death, then according to the Law of Karma, rebirth will take place according to the quality of his deeds. A person who has done many good deeds may be born in favorable conditions where he enjoys wealth and success, beauty and strength, good health, and meets good spiritual friends and teachers. Wholesome deeds can also lead to rebirth in the heavens and other sublime states, while unwholesome deeds lead to rebirth in suffering states. When a person understands the Law of Karma, he will then make the effort to refrain from performing bad actions, and to try to cultivate the good. By so acting, he gains benefits not only in this life, but in many other lives to come.

 

When a person understands the nature of man, then some important realizations arise. He realizes that unlike a rock or stone, a human being possesses the innate potential to grow in wisdom, compassion, and awareness?and be transformed by this self-development and growth. He also understands that it is not easy to be born as a human being, especially one who has the chance to listen to the Dhamma. In addition, he is fully aware that his life is impermanent, and he should, therefore, strive to practise the Dhamma while he is still in a position to do so. He realizes that the practice of Dhamma is a life-long educative process which enables him to release his true potentials trapped within his mind by ignorance and greed..

 

Based on these realizations and understanding, he will then try to be more aware of what and how he thinks, speaks and acts. He will consider if his thoughts, speech and actions are beneficial, done out of compassion and have good effects for himself as well as others. He will realize the true value of walking the road that leads to complete self transformation, which is known to Buddhists as the Noble Eightfold path. This Path can help a person to develop his moral strength (sila) through the restraint of negative actions and the cultivation of positive qualities conductive for personal, mental and spiritual growth. In addition, it contains many techniques which a person can apply to purify his thoughts, expand the possibilities of the mind, and bring about a complete change towards a wholesome personality. This practice of mental culture (bhavana) can widen and deepen the mind towards all human experience, as well as the nature and characteristics of phenomena, life and the universe. In short, this leads to the cultivation of wisdom (panna). As his wisdom grows, so will his love, compassion, kindness, and joy. He will have greater awareness to all forms of life and better understanding of his own thoughts, feelings, and motivations.

 

In the process of self-transformation, a person will no longer aspire for a divine birth as his ultimate goal in life. He will then set his goal much higher, and model himself after the Buddha who has reached the summit of human perfection and attained the ineffable state we call Enlightenment or Nibbana. It is here that a man develops a deep confidence in the Triple Gem and adopts the Buddha as his spiritual ideal. He will strive to eradicate greed, develop wisdom and compassion, and to be completely liberated from the bounds of Samsara.

 

-ooOoo-

 

Buddhism for man in society

 

This religion can be practised either in society or in seclusion.

 

There are some who believe that Buddhism is so lofty and sublime a system that it cannot be practised by ordinary men and women in the workday world. These same people think that one has to retire to a monastery or to some quiet place if one desires to be a true Buddhist.

 

This is a sad misconception that comes from a lack of understanding of the Buddha. People jump to such conclusions after casually reading or hearing something about Buddhism. Some people form their impression of Buddhism after reading articles or books that give only a partial or lopsided view of Buddhism. The authors of such articles and books have only a limited understanding of the Buddha's Teaching. His Teaching is not meant only for monks in monasteries. The Teaching is also for ordinary men and women living at home with their families. The Noble Eightfold Path is the Buddhist way of life that is intended for all people. This way of life is offered to all mankind without any distinction.

 

The vast majority of people in the world cannot become monks or retire into caves or forests. However noble and pure Buddhism may be, it would be useless to the masses if they could not follow it in their daily life in the modern world. But if you understand the spirit of Buddhism correctly, you can surely follow and practise it while living the life of an ordinary man.

 

There may be some who find it easier and more convenient to accept Buddhism by living in a remote place; in other words, by cutting themselves off from the society of others. Yet , other people may find that this kind of retirement dulls and depresses their whole being both physically and mentally, and that it may therefore not be conducive to the development of their spiritual and intellectual life.

 

True renunciation does not mean running away physically from the world. Sariputta, the chief disciple of the Buddha, said that one man might live in a forest devoting himself to ascetic practices, but might be full of impure thoughts and 'defilements'. Another might live in a village or a town, practising no ascetic discipline, but his mind might be pure, and free from 'defilements'. 'Of these two,' said, Sariputta, 'the one who lives a pure life in the village or town is definitely far superior to, and greater than, the one who lives in the forest.' (Majjhima Nikaya)

 

The common belief that to follow the Buddha's Teaching one has to retire from a normal family life is a misconception. It is really an unconscious defense against practising it. There are numerous references in Buddhist literature to men and women living ordinary, normal family lives who successfully practised what the Buddha taught and realized Nibbana. Vacchagotta the Wanderer, once asked the Buddha straightforwardly whether there were laymen and women leading the family life who followed His Teaching successfully and attained the high spiritual states. The Buddha categorically stated that there were many laymen and women leading the family life who had followed His Teaching successfully and attained the high spiritual states.

 

It may be agreeable for certain people to live a retired life in a quiet place away from noise and disturbances. But it is certainly more praiseworthy and courageous to practise Buddhism living among fellow beings, helping them and offering service to them. It may perhaps be useful in some cases for a man to live in retirement for a time in order to improve his mind and character, as a preliminary to moral, spiritual and intellectual training, to be strong enough to come out later and help others. But if a man lives all his life in solitude, thinking only of his own happiness and salvation, without caring for his fellowmen, this surely is not in keeping with the Buddha's Teaching which is based on love compassion and service to others.

 

One might now ask, 'If a man can follow Buddhism while living the life of an ordinary man, why was the Sangha, the Order of Monks, established by the Buddha?' The Order provides opportunity for those who are willing to devote their lives not only to their own spiritual and intellectual development, but also to the service of others. An ordinary layman with a family cannot be expected to devote his whole life to the service of others, whereas a Monk, who has no family responsibilities or any other worldly ties, is in a position to devote his life 'for the good of the many'.(Dr. Walpola Rahula)

 

And what is this 'good' that many can benefit from? The monk cannot give material comfort to a layman, but he can provide spiritual guidance to those who are troubled by worldly, family emotional problems and so on. The monk devotes his life to the pursuit of knowledge of the Dhamma as taught by the Buddha. He explains the Teaching in simplified form to the untutored layman. And if the layman is well educated, he is there to discuss the deeper aspects of the teaching so that both can gain intellectually from the discussion.

 

In Buddhist countries, monks are largely responsible for the education of the young. As a result of their contribution, Buddhist countries have populations which are literate and well-versed in spiritual values. Monks also comfort those who are bereaved and emotionally upset by explaining how all mankind is subject to similar disturbances.

 

In turn, the layman is expected to look after the material well-being of the monk who does not gain income to provide himself with food, shelter, medicine and clothing. In common Buddhist practice, it is considered meritorious for a layman to contribute to the health of a monk because by so doing he makes it possible for the monk to continue to minister to the spiritual needs of the people and for his mental purity.

 

-ooOoo-

 

The Buddhist Way of Life for Householders

 

The Buddha considered economic welfare as a requisite for human happiness, but moral and spiritual development for a happy, peaceful and contented life.

 

A man named Dighajanu once visited the Buddha and said, 'Venerable Sir, we are ordinary laymen, leading a family life with wife and children. Would the Blessed One teach us some doctrines which will be conducive to our happiness in this world and hereafter?

 

The Buddha told him that there are four things which are conducive to a man's happiness in this world. First: he should be skilled, efficient, earnest, and energetic in whatever profession he is engaged, and he should know it well (utthana-sampada); second: he should protect his income, which he has thus earned righteously, with the sweat of his brow (arakkha-sampada); third: he should have good friends (kalyana-mitta) who are faithful, learned, virtuous, liberal and intelligent, who will help him along the right path away from evil; fourth: he should spend reasonably, in proportion to his income, neither too much nor too little, i.e., he should not hoard wealth avariciously nor should he be extravagant?in other words he should live within his means (sama-jivikata).

 

Then the Buddha expounds the four virtues conducive to a layman's happiness hereafter: (1)Saddha: he should have faith and confidence in moral, spiritual and intellectual values; (2)Sila: he should abstain from destroying and harming life, from stealing and cheating, from adultery, from falsehood, and from intoxicating drinks; (3)Caga: he should practise charity, generosity, without attachment and craving for his wealth;(4)Panna: he should develop wisdom which leads to the complete destruction of suffering, to the realization of Nibbana.

 

Sometimes the Buddha even went into details about saving money and spending it, as, for instance, when he told the young man Sigala that he should spend on fourth of his income on his daily expenses, invest half in his business and put aside one fourth for any emergency.

 

Once the Buddha told Anathapindika, the great banker, one of His most devoted lay disciples who founded for Him the celebrated Jetavana monastery at Savatthi, that a layman who leads an ordinary family life has four kinds of happiness. The first happiness is to enjoy economic security or sufficient wealth acquired by just and righteous means (atthi-sukha); the second is spending that wealth liberally on himself, his family, his friends and relatives, and on meritorious deeds (bhogo-sukha); the third to be free from debts (anana-sukha); the fourth happiness is to live a faultless, and a pure life without committing evil in thought, word or deed (anavajja-sukha).

 

It must be noted here that first three are economic and material happiness which is 'not worth part' of the spiritual happiness arising out of a faultless and good life.

 

From the few examples given above, one can see that the Buddha considered economic welfare as a requisite for human happiness, but that He did not recognize progress as real and true if it was only material, devoid of a spiritual and moral foundation. While encouraging material progress, Buddhism always lays great stress on the development of the moral and spiritual character for a happy, peaceful and contented society.

 

Many people think that to be a good Buddhist one must have absolutely nothing to do with the materialistic life. This is not correct. What the Buddha teaches is that while we can enjoy material comforts without going to extremes, we must also conscientiously develop the spiritual aspects of our lives. While we can enjoy sensual pleasures as laymen, we should never be unduly attached to them to the extent that they hinder our spiritual progress. Buddhism emphasizes the need for a man to follow the Middle Path.

 

 

____________________

 

 

 

 

Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
22 Tháng Mười 2020(Xem: 9684)
22 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 4690)
19 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 5621)
18 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 4495)
09 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 3837)
23 Tháng Mười Hai 20209:43 CH(Xem: 4107)
Thiền mà Thầy hướng dẫn có một điều đặc biệt, đó là lý thuyếtthực hành xảy ra cùng một lúc chứ không mất thời gian tập luyện gì cả. Khi nghe pháp thoại mà một người thấy ra được vấn đề một cách rõ ràng thì ngay đó người ấy đã "thiền" rồi, chứ không có gì để mang về áp dụng hay hành theo cả. Thiền mục đích chỉ để thấy ra
22 Tháng Mười Hai 20209:09 CH(Xem: 4074)
Các vị Đạt Lai Lạt Ma [trong quá khứ ] đã nhận lãnh trách nhiệm như là những vị lãnh đạo chính trị và tâm linh của Tây Tạng trong suốt 369 năm từ năm 1642 cho đến nay. Giờ đây, bản thân tôi [Đạt Lai Lạt Ma đời thứ 14, Tenzin Gyatso] đã tình nguyện chấm dứt [việc nhận lãnh trách nhiệm] như trên. Tôi hãnh diệnhài lòng là giờ đây
21 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:35 CH(Xem: 3301)
Con không thể bỏ nhậu được vì do bản thân con không thể bỏ được rượu bia và vì trong công việc, gặp đối tác, bạn bè, người thân thì thường nhậu vài chai bia (trung bình 4-5 lần tháng). Con cảm thấy việc gặp gỡ và uống bia như thế cũng không có gì là tội lỗi và cũng cần thiết cho công việc và duy trì mối quan hệ xã hội. Nhưng sau một thời gian
20 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:53 CH(Xem: 3583)
Những kẻ đang gieo nhân cướp của giết người và những người đang chịu quả khổ báo đều là "các chúng sanh nhân vì trước kia chứa nhóm các nhiệp ác nên chiêu cảm tất cả quả rất khổ" thì đã có Bồ-Tát Phổ Hiền đại từ, đại bi, đại nhẫn, đại xả... chịu thay hết rồi, con đừng có dại mà đem cái tình hữu hạn của con vào giải quyết giùm họ
15 Tháng Mười Hai 202010:03 CH(Xem: 3728)
Phật giáo giảng rằng mọi vật thể và mọi biến cố, tức mọi hiện tượng trong thế giới này là « ảo giác », « bản thể tối hậu » của chúng chỉ là « trống không ». Bản chất của tất cả những gì xảy ra chung quanh ta, trong đó kể cả bản thântâm thức của ta nữa, đều « không thật », tức « không hàm chứa bất cứ một sự hiện hữu tự tại
14 Tháng Mười Hai 202010:57 CH(Xem: 3342)
Đức Phật đã tịch diệt hơn hai mươi lăm thế kỷ, và chỉ còn lại Đạo Pháp được lưu truyền cho đến ngày nay. Thế nhưng Đạo Pháp thì lại vô cùng sâu sắc, đa dạng và khúc triết, đấy là chưa kể đến các sự biến dạngthêm thắt trên mặt giáo lý cũng như các phép tu tập đã được "sáng chế" thêm để thích nghi với thời đại, bản tính
13 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:25 CH(Xem: 3783)
Vipassana có thể được dịch là “Tuệ”, một sự tỉnh giác sáng suốt về những gì xuất hiện đúng như chính chúng xuất hiện. Samatha có thể được dịch là “Định” (sự “tập trung”, quán; hay sự “tĩnh lặng”, tịnh, chỉ). Đây là một trạng thái mà tâm được đưa vào sự ngưng nghỉ, chỉ hội tụ duy nhất vào một chủ đề, không được phép lang thang.
12 Tháng Mười Hai 202010:58 CH(Xem: 3576)
Thầy đã từng nói "dù sự cố gì trên đời đến với mình đều có lợi, không có hại" và đều có nhân duyên hợp tình hợp lý của nó. Vì mình nghĩ theo hướng khác nên mới có cảm giác như những sự cố đó nghịch lại với mình thôi. Sở dĩ như vậy vì mọi sự đều do duyên nghiệp chính mình đã tạo ra trong quá khứ, nay đương nhiên phải gặt quả.
10 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:10 CH(Xem: 3871)
Khi hiểu được bản chất của cuộc đờiVô thường, Khổ và Vô ngã thì chúng ta sẽ hành động có mục đích hơn. Nếu không thì chúng ta sẽ luôn sống trong ảo tưởngniềm tin mơ hồ về những cái không thậtcoi thường việc phát triển các giá trị tinh thần cho đến khi quá trễ. Có một câu chuyện ngụ ngôn về tâm lý này của con người
08 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:04 CH(Xem: 3777)
Con nói đúng, nếu về quê con sẽ có một cuộc sống tương đối bình yên, ít phiền não, ít va chạm, nhưng chưa chắc thế đã là tốt cho sự tu tập của mình. Môi trường nào giúp mình rèn luyện được các đức tính, các phẩm chất Tín Tấn Niệm Định Tuệ, các ba la mật cần thiết cho sự giác ngộ, môi trường ấy là môi trường lý tưởng để tu tập.
06 Tháng Mười Hai 20208:18 CH(Xem: 3714)
Bạn muốn chết trong phòng cấp cứu? Trong một tai nạn? Trong lửa hay trong nước? Hay trong nhà dưỡng lão hoặc phòng hồi phục trí nhớ? Câu trả lời: Chắc là không. Nếu bạn sẵn lòng suy nghĩ về đề tài này, có thể bạn thà chết ở nhà với người thân bên cạnh. Bạn muốn được ra đi mà không phải đau đớn. Muốn còn nói năng được
05 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:21 CH(Xem: 4297)
Sợ là một cảm xúc khó chịu phát khởi chủ yếu từ lòng tham. Tham và sự bám chấp là nhân cho nhiều thứ bất thiện, phiền nãoác nghiệp trong đời. Vì hai thứ này mà chúng ta lang thang trong vòng luân hồi sinh tử (samsāra). Ngược lại, tâm vô úy, không sợ hãi, là trạng thái của sự bình an, tĩnh lặng tuyệt hảo, và là thứ ân sủng
04 Tháng Mười Hai 20208:48 CH(Xem: 3615)
Thưa Thầy, con không phải là Phật tử, con cũng không theo Đạo Phật. Nhưng mỗi ngày con đều nghe Thầy giảng. Con cũng không biết về kinh kệ Phật giáo hay pháp môn thiền nào nhưng con biết tất cả những gì Thầy giảng là muốn cho những người Phật tử hay những người không biết Đạo giống con hiểu về chân đế,
03 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:17 CH(Xem: 3464)
Thầy nói nếu con tu tập, mọi thứ sẽ tốt đẹp lên theo nghĩa là tu tập sẽ làm con bớt phiền não, bớt sai lầm và bớt bị quá khứ ám ảnhchi phối hiện tại của con – và để con trưởng thành hơn, sống bình aný nghĩa hơn trong hiện tại, chứ không phải nghĩa là mọi việc sẽ “tốt” trở lại y như xưa, hay là con sẽ có lại tài sản đã mất…
02 Tháng Mười Hai 202011:16 CH(Xem: 3183)
Kính thưa Thầy, con xin Thầy giảng rộng cho con hiểu một vài câu hỏi nhỏ. Con nghe chị con nói ở bên Ấn Độ có nhiều người giả làm ăn mày nên khi bố thí thì cẩn thận kẻo không bị lầm. Vả lại, khi xưa có một vị Thiền sư đã từng bố thí con mắt của Ngài. Hai kiểu bố thí trên thực tế có được gọi là thông minh không? Thưa Thầy,
30 Tháng Mười Một 20209:41 CH(Xem: 3395)
Tôn giả Phú Lâu Na thực hiện đúng như lời Phật dạy là sáu căn không dính mắc với sáu trần làm căn bản, cộng thêm thái độ không giận hờn, không oán thù, trước mọi đối xử tệ hại của người, nên ngài chóng đến Niết bàn. Hiện tại nếu có người mắng chưởi hay đánh đập, chúng ta nhịn họ, nhưng trong tâm nghĩ đây là kẻ ác, rán mà nhịn nó.
29 Tháng Mười Một 20208:53 CH(Xem: 3347)
Hôm nay tôi sẽ nhắc lại bài thuyết pháp đầu tiên của Đức Phật cho quý vị nghe. Vì tất cả chúng ta tu mà nếu không nắm vững đầu mối của sự tu hành đó, thì có thể mình dễ đi lạc hoặc đi sai. Vì vậy nên hôm nay tôi nhân ngày cuối năm để nhắc lại bài thuyết pháp đầu tiên của Đức Phật, để mỗi người thấy rõ con đườngĐức Phật
28 Tháng Mười Một 202010:29 CH(Xem: 3362)
Tôi được biết về Pháp qua hai bản kinh: “Ai thấy được lý duyên khởi, người ấy thấy được Pháp; ai thấy được Pháp, người ấy thấy được lý duyên khởi” (Kinh Trung bộ, số 28, Đại kinh Dụ dấu chân voi) và “Ai thấy Pháp, người ấy thấy Như Lai; ai thấy Như Lai, người ấy thấy Pháp (Kinh Tương ưng bộ). Xin quý báo vui lòng giải thích Pháp là gì?
27 Tháng Mười Một 202011:20 CH(Xem: 3623)
Kính thưa Sư Ông, Con đang như 1 ly nước bị lẫn đất đá cặn bã, bị mây mờ ngăn che tầng tầng lớp lớp, vô minh dày đặc nên không thể trọn vẹn với thực tại, đôi khi lại tưởng mình đang học đạo nhưng hóa ra lại là bản ngã thể hiện. Như vậy bây giờ con phải làm sao đây thưa Sư Ông? Xin Sư Ông từ bi chỉ dạy cho con. Kính chúc
26 Tháng Mười Một 202011:32 CH(Xem: 3141)
Tại sao người Ấn lại nói bất kỳ người nào mình gặp cũng đều là người đáng gặp? Có lẽ vì người nào mà mình có duyên gặp đều giúp mình học ra bài học về bản chất con người để mình tùy duyên mà có thái độ ứng xử cho đúng tốt. Nếu vội vàngthái độ chấp nhận hay chối bỏ họ thì con không thể học được điều gì từ những người
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 4282)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 5896)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 7827)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
19 Tháng Mười Một 20206:34 CH(Xem: 4148)
Khi tôi viết về đề tài sống với cái đau, tôi không cần phải dùng đến trí tưởng tượng. Từ năm 1976, tôi bị khổ sở với một chứng bệnh nhức đầu kinh niên và nó tăng dần thêm theo năm tháng. Tình trạng này cũng giống như có ai đó khiêng một tảng đá hoa cương thật to chặn ngay trên con đường tu tập của tôi. Cơn đau ấy thường xóa trắng
08 Tháng Mười Một 20207:59 CH(Xem: 4080)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, tác giả quyển sách này là một nữ cư sĩ Thái lan. Chữ upasika trong tiếng Pa-li và tiếng Phạn có nghĩa là một cư sĩ phụ nữ. Thật thế, bà là một người tự tu tậpsuốt đời chỉ tự nhận mình là một người tu hành thế tục, thế nhưng giới tu hành
06 Tháng Mười Một 202011:19 CH(Xem: 3647)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, còn được biết đến qua bút danh, K. Khao-suan-luang, là một vị nữ Pháp sư nổi tiếng nhất trong thế kỷ 20 ở Thái Lan. Sinh năm 1901, trong một gia đình thương nhân Trung Hoa ở Rajburi (một thành phố ở phía Tây Bangkok), bà là con cả
23 Tháng Mười Một 202010:04 CH(Xem: 3879)
Thầy Xá Lợi Phất - anh cả trong giáo đoàn - có dạy một kinh gọi là Kinh Thủy Dụ mà chúng ta có thể học hôm nay. Kinh này giúp chúng ta quán chiếu để đối trị hữu hiệu cái giận. Kinh Thủy Dụ là một kinh trong bộ Trung A Hàm. Thủy là nước. Khi khát ta cần nước để uống, khi nóng bức ta cần nước để tắm gội. Những lúc khát khô cổ,
22 Tháng Mười 20201:00 CH(Xem: 9684)
Tuy nhiên đối với thiền sinh hay ít ra những ai đang hướng về chân trời rực rỡ ánh hồng giải thoát, có thể nói Kinh Đại Niệm Xứbài kinh thỏa thích nhất hay đúng hơn là bài kinh tối cần, gần gũi nhất. Tối cần như cốt tủy và gần gũi như máu chảy khắp châu thân. Những lời kinh như những lời thiên thu gọi hãy dũng mãnh lên đường
21 Tháng Mười 202010:42 CH(Xem: 3228)
Một lần Đấng Thế Tôn ngụ tại tu viện của Cấp Cô Độc (Anathapindita) nơi khu vườn Kỳ Đà Lâm (Jeta) gần thị trấn Xá Vệ (Savatthi). Vào lúc đó có một vị Bà-la-môn to béo và giàu sang đang chuẩn bị để chủ tế một lễ hiến sinh thật to. Số súc vật sắp bị giết gồm năm trăm con bò mộng, năm trăm con bê đực, năm trăm con bò cái tơ,
20 Tháng Mười 20209:07 CH(Xem: 3335)
Tôi sinh ra trong một gia đình thấp hèn, Cực khổ, dăm bữa đói một bữa no. Sinh sống với một nghề hèn mọn: Quét dọn và nhặt hoa héo rơi xuống từ các bệ thờ (của những người Bà-la-môn). Chẳng ai màng đến tôi, mọi người khinh miệt và hay rầy mắng tôi, Hễ gặp ai thì tôi cũng phải cúi đầu vái lạy. Thế rồi một hôm, tôi được diện kiến
14 Tháng Mười 202010:00 SA(Xem: 6246)
Một thời Đức Phật ở chùa Kỳ Viên thuộc thành Xá Vệ do Cấp Cô Độc phát tâm hiến cúng. Bấy giờ, Bāhiya là một người theo giáo phái Áo Vải, sống ở vùng đất Suppāraka ở cạnh bờ biển. Ông là một người được thờ phụng, kính ngưỡng, ngợi ca, tôn vinh và kính lễ. Ông là một người lỗi lạc, được nhiều người thần phục.
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 5558)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng