Chapter 16: Realms of Existence

30 Tháng Ba 20209:30 CH(Xem: 1089)
Chapter 16: Realms of Existence


WhatBuddhistsBelieve_BWhat Buddhists Believe - Vì Sao Tin Phật

K. Sri Dhammananda

Thích Tâm Quang dịch Việt

Source-Nguồn: budsas.org, buddhanet.net, samanta.vn

 

____________________

-----------------------------

 

 

Part Six - This World And Other Worlds

 

Chapter 16 - Realms of Existence

 


 

The Origin of the World

 

'There is no reason to suppose that the world had a beginning at all. The idea that things must have a beginning is really due to the poverty of our thoughts.'(Bertrand Russell)

 

There are three schools of thought regarding the origin of the world. The first school of thought claims that this world came into existence by nature and that nature is not an intelligent force. However, nature works no its own accord and goes on changing.

 

The second school of thought says that the world was created by an almighty God who is responsible for everything.

 

The third school of thought says that the beginning of this world and of life is inconceivable since they have neither beginning nor end. Buddhism is in accordance with this third school of thought. Bertrand Russell supports this school of thought by saying, 'There is no reason to suppose that the world had a beginning at all. The idea that things must have a beginning is really due to the poverty of our thoughts.'

 

Modern science says that some millions of years ago, the newly cooled earth was lifeless and that life originated in the ocean. Buddhism never claimed that the world, sun, moon, stars, wind, water, days and nights were created by a powerful god or by a Buddha. Buddhists believe that the world was not created once upon a time, but that the world has been created millions of times every second and will continue to do so by itself and will break away by itself. According to Buddhism, world systems always appear and disappear in the universe.

 

H.G. Wells, in A Short History of the World, says 'It is universally recognized that the universe in which we live, has to all appearance, existed for an enormous period of time and possibly for endless time. But that the universe in which we live, has existed only for six or seven thousand years may be regarded as an altogether exploded idea. No life seems to have happened suddenly upon earth.'

 

The efforts made by many religions to explain the beginning and the end of the universe are indeed ill-conceived. The position of religions which propound the view that the universe was created by god in an exactly fixed year, has become a difficult one to maintain in the light of modern and scientific knowledge.

 

Today scientists, historians, astronomers, biologists, botanists, anthropologists and great thinkers have all contributed vast new knowledge about the origin of the world. This latest discovery and knowledge is not at all contradictory to the Teachings of the Buddha. Bertrand Russell again says that he respects the Buddha for not making false statements like others who committed themselves regarding the origin of the world.

 

The speculative explanations of the origin of the universe that are presented by various religions are not acceptable to the modern scientists and intellectuals. Even the commentaries of the Buddhist Scriptures, written by certain Buddhist writers, cannot be challenged by scientific thinking in regard to this question. The Buddha did not waste His time on this issue. The reason for His silence was that this issue has no religious value for gaining spiritual wisdom. The explanation of the origin of the universe is not the concern of religion. Such theorizing is not necessary for living a righteous way of life and for shaping our future life. However, if one insists on studying this subject, then one must investigate the sciences, astronomy, geology, biology and anthropology. These sciences can offer more reliable and tested information on this subject than can be supplied by any religion. The purpose of a religion is to cultivate the life here in this world and hereafter until liberation is gained.

 

In the eyes of the Buddha, the world is nothing but Samsara -- the cycle of repeated births and deaths. To Him, the beginning of the world and the end of the world is within this Samsara. Since elements and energies are relative and inter-dependent, it is meaningless to single out anything as the beginning. Whatever speculation we make regarding the origin of the world, there is no absolute truth in our notion.

 

'Infinite is the sky, infinite is the number of beings,
Infinite are the worlds in the vast universe,
Infinite in wisdom the Buddha teaches these,
Infinite are the virtues of Him who teaches these.' - (Sri Ramachandra)

 

One day a man called Malunkyaputta approached the Master and demanded that He explain the origin of the Universe to him. He even threatened to cease to be His follow if the Buddha's answer was not satisfactory. The Buddha calmly retorted that it was of no consequence to Him whether or not Malunkyaputta followed Him, because the Truth did not need anyone's support. Then the Buddha said that He would not go into a discussion of the origin of the Universe. To Him, gaining knowledge about such matters was a waste of time because a man's task was to liberate himself from the present, not the past or the future. To illustrate this, the Enlightened One related the parable of a man who was shot by a poisoned arrow. This foolish man refused to have the arrow removed until he found out all about the person who shot the arrow. By the time his attendants discovered these unnecessary details, the man was dead. Similarly, our immediate task is to attain Nibbana, not to worry about our beginnings.

 

-ooOoo-

 

Other World Systems
 

 

In the light of modern, scientific discoveries, we can appreciate the limitations of the human world and the hypothesis that other world systems might exist in other parts of the universe.

 

On certain occasions, the Buddha has commented on the nature and composition of the universe. According to the Buddha, there are some other forms of life existing in other parts of the universe. The Buddha has mentioned that there are thirty-one planes of existence within the universes. They are:

 

 4 States of unhappiness or sub human realms: (life in hells, animal life, ghost-worlds and demon-worlds)

 

 1 Human world.

 

 6 Develokas or heavenly realms.

 

 16 Rupalokas or Realms of Fine-Material Forms.

 

 4 Arupalokas or Formless Realms.

 

The existence of these other-world systems is yet to be confirmed by modern science. However, modern scientists are now working with the hypothesis that there is a possibility of other forms of life existing on other planets. As a result of today's rapid scientific progress, we may soon find some living beings on other planets in the remotest parts of the galaxy system. Perhaps, we will find them subject to the same laws as ourselves. They might be physically quite different in both appearance, elements and chemical composition and exist in different dimensions. They might be far superior to us or they might be far inferior.

 

Why should the planet earth be the only planet to contain life forms? Earth is a tiny speck in a huge universe. Sir James Jeans, the distinguished astrophysicist, estimates the whole universe to be about one thousand million times as big as the area of space that is visible through the telescope. In his book, The Mysterious Universe, he states that the total number of universes is probably something like the total number of grains of sand on all the sea shores of the world. In such a universe, the planet Earth is only from the sun which takes a seventh of a second to reach the earth, takes probably something like 100,000 million years to travel across the universe! Such is the vastness of the cosmos. When we consider the vastness of the many universes making up what is popularly known as 'outer space', the hypothesis that other-world systems might exist is scientifically feasible.

 

In the light of modern scientific discoveries, we can appreciate the limitations of the human world. Today, science has demonstrated that our human world exists within the limitations of the vibrational frequencies that can be received by our sense organs. And science has also shown us that there are other vibrational frequencies which are above or below our range of reception. With the discovery of radio waves, X-rays, TV waves, and micro waves, we can appreciate the extremely limited vision that is imposed on us by our sense organs. We peep out at the universe through the 'crack' allowed by our sense organs, just as a little child peeps out through the crack in the door. This awareness of our limited perception demonstrates to us the possibility that other world systems may exist that are separate from ours or that interpenetrate with ours.

 

As to the nature of the universe, the Buddha said that the beginning and ending of the universe is inconceivable. Buddhists do not believe that the world will suddenly end in complete and utter destruction. There is no such thing as complete destruction of the whole universe at once. When a certain section of the universe disappears, another section remains. When the other section disappears, another section reappears or evolves out of the dispersed matters of the previous universe. This is formed by the accumulation of molecules, basic elements, gas and numerous energies, a combination supported by cosmic impulsion and gravity. Then some other new world systems appear and exist for sometime. This is the nature of the cosmic energies. This is why the Buddha says that the beginning and the end of the universe is inconceivable.

 

It was only on certain, special occasions, that the Buddha commented on the nature and composition of the universe. When he spoke, He had to address Himself to the understanding capacity of the inquirer. The Buddha was not interested in this kind of metaphysical speculation that did not lead to the higher spiritual development.

 

Buddhists do not share the view held by some people that the world will be destroyed by a god, when there are more non-believers and more corruptions taking place amongst the human beings. With regard to this belief people can ask, instead of destroying with his power, why can't this god used the same power to influence people to become believers and to wipe out al immoral practices from men's mind? Whether the god destroys or not, it is natural that one day there will be an end to everything that comes into existence. However, in the language of the Buddha, the world is nothing more than the combination, existence, disappearance, and recombination of mind and matter(nama-rupa).

 

In the final analysis, the Teaching of the Buddha goes beyond the discoveries of modern science however startling or impressive they may be. In science, the knowledge of the universe is to enable man to master it for his material comfort and personal safety. But the Buddha teaches that no amount of factual knowledge will ultimately free man from the pain of existence. He must strive alone and diligently until he arrives at a true understanding of his own nature and of the changeable nature of the cosmos. To be truly free a man must seek to tame his min, to destroy his craving for sensual pleasure. When a man truly understands that the universe he is trying to conquer is impermanent, he will see himself as Don Quixote fighting windmills. With this Right View of himself he will spend his time and energy conquering his mind and destroying his illusion of self without wasting his effort on unimportant and unnecessary issues.

 

-ooOoo-

 

The Buddhist Concept of Heaven and Hell
 

 

The wise man makes his own heaven while the foolish man creates his own hell here and hereafter.

 

The Buddhist concept of heaven and hell is entirely different from that in other religions. Buddhists do not accept that these places are eternal. It is unreasonable to condemn a man to eternal hell for his human weakness but quite reasonable to give him every chance to develop himself. From the Buddhist point of view, those who go to hell can work themselves upward by making use of the merit that they had acquired previously. There are no locks on the gates of hell. Hell is a temporary place and there is no reason for those beings to suffer there forever.

 

The Buddha's Teaching shows us that there are heavens and hells not only beyond this world, but in this very world itself. Thus the Buddhist conception of heaven and hell is very reasonable. For instance, the Buddha once said, 'When the average ignorant person makes an assertion to the effect that there is a Hell (patala) under the ocean he is making a statement which is false and without basis. The word 'Hell' is a term for painful sensations. 'The idea of one particular ready-made place or a place created by god as heaven and hell is not acceptable to the Buddhist concept.

 

The fire of hell in this world is hotter than that of the hell in the world-beyond. There is no fire equal to anger, lust or greed and ignorance. According to the Buddha, we are burning from eleven kinds of physical pain and mental agony: lust, hatred, illusion sickness, decay, death, worry, lamentation, pain(physical and mental), melancholy and grief. People can burn the entire world with some of these fires of mental discord. From a Buddhist point of view, the easiest way to define hell and heaven is that where ever there is more suffering, either in this world or any other plane, that place is a hell to those who suffer. And where there is more pleasure or happiness, either in this world or any other worldly existence, that place is a heaven to those who enjoy their worldly life in that particular place. However, as the human realm is a mixture of both pain and happiness, human beings experience both pain and happiness and will be able to realize the real nature of life. But in many other planes of existence inhabitants have less chance for this realization. In certain places there is more suffering than pleasure while in some other places there is more pleasure than suffering.

 

Buddhists believe that after death rebirth can take place in any one of a number of possible existences. This future existence is conditioned by the last thought-moment a person experiences at the point of death. This last thought which determines the next existence results from the past actions of a man either in this life or before that. Hence, if the predominant thought reflects meritorious action, then he will find his future existence in a happy state. But that state is temporary and when it is exhausted a new life must begin all over again, determined by another dominating 'kammic' energy. This repetitious process goes on endlessly unless one arrives at 'Right View' and makes a firm resolve to follow the Noble Path which produces the ultimate happiness of Nibbana.

 

Heaven is a temporary place where those who have done good deeds experience more sensual pleasures for a longer period. Hell is another temporary place where those evil doers experience more physical and mental suffering. It is not justifiable to believe that such places are permanent. There is no god behind the scene of heaven and hell. Each and every person experiences according to his good and bad kamma. Buddhist never try to introduce Buddhism by frightening people through hell-fire or enticing people by pointing to paradise. Their main idea is character building and mental training. Buddhists can practise their religion without aiming at heaven or without developing fear of hell.

 

-ooOoo-

 

Belief in Deities (Devas)

 

Buddhists do not deny the existence of various gods or deities.

 

Devas are more fortunate than human beings as far as sensual pleasures are concerned. They also possess certain powers which human beings usually lack. However, the powers of these deities are limited because they are also transitory beings. They exist in happy abodes and enjoy their life for a longer period than human beings do. When they have exhausted all the good kamma, that they have gathered during previous birth, these deities pass away and are reborn somewhere else according to their good and bad kamma. According to the Buddha, human beings have more opportunities to accrue merits to be born in a better condition, and the deities have less chances in this respect.

 

Buddhist do not attribute any specific importance to such gods. They do not regard the deities as a support for the moral development or as a support for the attainment of salvation of Nibbana. Whether they are great or small, both human beings and deities are perishable and subject to rebirth.

 

It is a common belief amongst the Buddhist public that such deities can be influenced to grant their favours by transferring merits to them whenever meritorious deeds are performed. This belief is based on the Buddha's injunction to the deities to protect those human beings who lead a religious way of life. This is the reason why Buddhists transfer the merits to such deities or remember them whenever they do some meritorious deeds. However, making of offerings to and worshipping such deities are not encouraged, although some Buddhist customs center around such activities. When people are in great difficulties, they naturally turn to the deities to express their grievances in a place of worship. By doing this, they gain some relief and consolation; in their hearts, they feel much better. However, to an intellectual who has strong will power, sound education and understanding, such beliefs and actions need not be resorted to. There is definitely no Teaching in Buddhism to the effect that Buddhists can attain Nibbana by praying to any deity. Buddhists believe that 'purity and impurity depend on oneself. No one from outside can purify another.' (Dhammapada 165)

 

Buddhahood and Nibbanacan be attained without any help from an external source. Therefore, Buddhists can practise their religion with or without the deities.

 

-ooOoo-

 

Spirit World

 

There are visible and invisible beings or spirits in the same way as there are visible and invisible lights.

 

Buddhism does not deny the existence of good and evil spirits. There are visible and invisible beings or spirits in the same way as there are visible and invisible lights. We need special instruments to see the invisible light and we need a special sense to see the invisible beings. One cannot deny the existence of such spirits just because one is unable to see them with one's naked eyes. Theses spirits are also subject to birth and death. They are not going to stay permanently in the spirit form. They too exist in the same world where we live.

 

A genuine Buddhist is one who moulds his life according to moral causation discovered by the Buddha. He should not be concerned with the worshipping of these gods and spirits. However, this kind of worshipping is of some interest and fascination to the multitude and has naturally brought some Buddhists into contact with these activities.

 

Regarding protection from evil spirits, goodness is a shield against evil. Goodness is a wall through which evil cannot penetrate unless a person opens the door to an evil influence. Even though a person leads a truly virtuous and holy life and has a good shield of moral and noble living that person can still lower his shield of protection by believing in the power of evil that would do harm to him.

 

The Buddha has never advised His followers to worship such spirits and to be frightened of them. The Buddhist attitude towards them is to transfer merits and to radiate loving-kindness to them. Buddhists do not harm them. On the other hand, if man is religious, virtuous and pure in mind, and if he is also intelligent and possesses strong will-power and understanding capacity, then such a person could be deemed to be much stronger than spirits. The evil spirits would keep away from him, the good spirits would protect him.

 

-ooOoo-

 

The Significance of Transference of Merits
to the Departed
 

 

If you really want to honor and help your departed ones, then do some meritorious deeds in their name and transfer the merits to them.

 

According to Buddhism, good deeds or 'acts of merit' bring happiness to the doer both in this world and in the hereafter. Acts of merit are also believed to lead towards the final goal of everlasting happiness. The acts of merit can be performed through body, speech or mind. Every good deed produces 'merit' which accumulates to the 'credit' of the doer. Buddhism also teaches that the acquired merit can be transferred to others' it can be shared vicariously with others. In other words, the merit is 'reversible' and so can be shared with other persons. The persons who receive the merit can be either living or departed ones.

 

The method for transferring merits is quite simple. First some good deeds are performed. The doer of the good deeds has merely to wish that the merit he has gained accrues to someone in particular, or to 'all beings'. This wish can be purely mental or it can accompanied by an expression of words.

 

This wish could be made with the beneficiary being aware of it. When the beneficiary is aware of the act or wish, then a mutual 'rejoicing in' merit takes place. Here the beneficiary becomes a participant of the original deed by associating himself with the deed done. If the beneficiary identifies himself with both the deed and the doer, he can sometimes acquire even greater merit than the original doer, either because his elation is greater or because his appreciation of the value of the deed is based on his understanding of Dhamma and, hence, more meritorious, Buddhist texts contain several stories of such instances.

 

The 'joy of transference of merits' can also take place with or without the knowledge of the doer of the meritorious act. All that is necessary is for the beneficiary to feel gladness in his heart when he becomes aware of the good deed. If he wishes, he can express his joy by saying 'sadhu' which means 'well done'. What he is doing is creating a kind of mental or verbal applause. In order to share the good deed done by another, what is important is that there must be actual approval of the deed and joy arising in the beneficiary's heart.

 

Even if he so desires, the doer of a good deed cannot prevent another's 'rejoicing in the merit' because he has no power over another's thoughts. According to the Buddha, in all actions, thought is what really matters. Transference is primarily an act of the mind.

 

To transfer merit does not mean that a person is deprived of the merit had originally acquired by his good deed. On the contrary, the very act of  'transference' is a good deed in itself and hence enhances the merit already earned.

 

Highest Gift to the Departed

 

The Buddha says that the greatest gift one can confer on one's dead ancestors is to perform 'acts of merit' and to transfer these merits so acquired. He also says that those who give also receive the fruits of their deeds. The Buddha encouraged those who did good deeds such as offering alms to holy men, to transfer the merits which they received to their departed ones. Alms should be given in the name of the departed by recalling to mind such things as, 'When he was alive, he gave me this wealth; he did this for me; he was my relative, my companion, etc. (Tirokuddha Sutta --  Khuddakapatha). There is no use weeping, feeling sorry, lamenting and bewailing; such attitudes are of no consequence to the departed ones.

 

Transferring merits to the departed is based on the popular belief that on a person's death, his 'merits' and 'demerits' are weighed against one another and his destiny determined, his actions determined whether he is to be reborn in a sphere of happiness or a realm of woe. The belief is that the departed one might have gone to the world of the departed spirits. The beings in these lower forms of existence cannot generate fresh merits, and have to live on with the merits which are earned from this world.

 

Those who did not harm others and who performed many good deeds during their life time, will certainly have the chance to be reborn in a happy place. Such persons do not required the help of living relatives. However, those who have no chance to be reborn in a happy abode are always waiting to receive merits from their living relatives to offset their deficiency and to enable them to be born in a happy abode.

 

Those who are reborn in an unfortunate spirit form could be released from their suffering condition through the transferring of merits to them by friends and relatives who do some meritorious deeds.

 

This injunction of the Buddha to transfer merits to departed ones is the counterpart of the Hindu custom which has come down through the ages. Various ceremonies are performed so that the spirits of dead ancestors might live in peace. This custom has been a tremendous influence on the social life of certain Buddhist countries. The dead are always remembered when any good deed is done, and more on occasions connected with their lives, such as their birth or death anniversaries. On such occasions, there is a ritual which is generally practised. The transferor pours water from a jug or other similar vessel into a receptacle, while repeating a Pali formula which is translated as follows:

 

As river, when full must flow
and reach and fill the distant main,
So indeed what is given here will
reach and bless the spirits there.
As water poured on mountain top must
soon descend and fill the plain
So indeed what is given here will reach
and bless the spirits there.

(Nidhikanda Sutta in Khuddakapatha)

 

The origin and the significance of transference of merit is open to scholarly debate. Although this ancient custom still exists today in many Buddhists countries, very few Buddhists who follow this ancient custom have understood the meaning of transference of merits and the proper way to do that.

 

Some people are simply wasting time and money on meaningless ceremonies and performances in memory of departed ones. These people do not realize that it is impossible to help the departed ones simply by building big graveyards, tombs, paper-houses and other paraphernalia Neither is it possible to help the departed by burning joss-sticks, joss-paper, etc.; nor is it possible to help the departed by slaughtering animals and offering them along with other kinds of food. Also one should not waste by burning things used by the departed ones on the assumption that the deceased persons would somehow benefit by the act, when such articles can in fact be distributed among the needy.

 

The only way to help the departed ones is to do some meritorious deeds in a religious way in memory of them. The meritorious deeds include such acts as giving alms to others, building schools, temples, orphanages, libraries, hospitals, printing religious books for free distribution and similar charitable deeds.

 

The followers of the Buddha should act wisely and should not follow anything blindly. While others pray to god for the departed ones, Buddhists radiate their loving-kindness directly to them. By doing meritorious deeds, they can transfer the merits to their beloved ones for their well-being. This is the best way of remembering and giving real honor to and perpetuating the names of the departed ones. In their state of happiness, the departed ones will reciprocate their blessings on their living relatives. It is, therefore, the duty of relatives to remember their departed ones by transferring merits and by radiating loving-kindness directly to them.

 

 

____________________

 

 

 

 

Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
22 Tháng Mười 2020(Xem: 5343)
22 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1681)
19 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1835)
18 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1594)
09 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1282)
30 Tháng Mười Một 20209:41 CH(Xem: 78)
Tôn giả Phú Lâu Na thực hiện đúng như lời Phật dạy là sáu căn không dính mắc với sáu trần làm căn bản, cộng thêm thái độ không giận hờn, không oán thù, trước mọi đối xử tệ hại của người, nên ngài chóng đến Niết bàn. Hiện tại nếu có người mắng chưởi hay đánh đập, chúng ta nhịn họ, nhưng trong tâm nghĩ đây là kẻ ác, rán mà nhịn nó.
29 Tháng Mười Một 20208:53 CH(Xem: 136)
Hôm nay tôi sẽ nhắc lại bài thuyết pháp đầu tiên của Đức Phật cho quý vị nghe. Vì tất cả chúng ta tu mà nếu không nắm vững đầu mối của sự tu hành đó, thì có thể mình dễ đi lạc hoặc đi sai. Vì vậy nên hôm nay tôi nhân ngày cuối năm để nhắc lại bài thuyết pháp đầu tiên của Đức Phật, để mỗi người thấy rõ con đườngĐức Phật
28 Tháng Mười Một 202010:29 CH(Xem: 147)
Tôi được biết về Pháp qua hai bản kinh: “Ai thấy được lý duyên khởi, người ấy thấy được Pháp; ai thấy được Pháp, người ấy thấy được lý duyên khởi” (Kinh Trung bộ, số 28, Đại kinh Dụ dấu chân voi) và “Ai thấy Pháp, người ấy thấy Như Lai; ai thấy Như Lai, người ấy thấy Pháp (Kinh Tương ưng bộ). Xin quý báo vui lòng giải thích Pháp là gì?
27 Tháng Mười Một 202011:20 CH(Xem: 160)
Kính thưa Sư Ông, Con đang như 1 ly nước bị lẫn đất đá cặn bã, bị mây mờ ngăn che tầng tầng lớp lớp, vô minh dày đặc nên không thể trọn vẹn với thực tại, đôi khi lại tưởng mình đang học đạo nhưng hóa ra lại là bản ngã thể hiện. Như vậy bây giờ con phải làm sao đây thưa Sư Ông? Xin Sư Ông từ bi chỉ dạy cho con. Kính chúc
26 Tháng Mười Một 202011:32 CH(Xem: 152)
Tại sao người Ấn lại nói bất kỳ người nào mình gặp cũng đều là người đáng gặp? Có lẽ vì người nào mà mình có duyên gặp đều giúp mình học ra bài học về bản chất con người để mình tùy duyên mà có thái độ ứng xử cho đúng tốt. Nếu vội vàngthái độ chấp nhận hay chối bỏ họ thì con không thể học được điều gì từ những người
25 Tháng Mười Một 202011:39 CH(Xem: 180)
Thưa Thầy! Tôi nay đã 70 tuổi, vừa mới về hưu, vợ thì đã qua đời cách đây hơn chục năm. Tưởng chừng ở tuổi này tôi có thể an dưỡng tuổi già nhưng không Thầy ạ, tôi không biết mình từng tạo nghiệp gì để bây giờ con cháu suốt ngày gây sự với nhau. Cháu đích tôn của tôi hồi đó đặt kỳ vọng bao nhiêu, bây giờ lại ăn chơi lêu lổng,
24 Tháng Mười Một 20209:29 CH(Xem: 174)
Khi mới xuất gia, tôi không có ý định trở thành một dịch giả. Vị thầy đầu tiên của tôi là một tu sĩ người Việt, và tôi ở với thầy tại California trong thập niên 1960. Thầy đã chỉ cho tôi thấy tầm quan trọng trong việc học các loại ngữ văn của kinh điển Phật giáo, bắt đầu là tiếng Pāli, như là một công cụ để thông hiểu Giáo Pháp. Khi tôi đến
23 Tháng Mười Một 202010:04 CH(Xem: 215)
Thầy Xá Lợi Phất - anh cả trong giáo đoàn - có dạy một kinh gọi là Kinh Thủy Dụ mà chúng ta có thể học hôm nay. Kinh này giúp chúng ta quán chiếu để đối trị hữu hiệu cái giận. Kinh Thủy Dụ là một kinh trong bộ Trung A Hàm. Thủy là nước. Khi khát ta cần nước để uống, khi nóng bức ta cần nước để tắm gội. Những lúc khát khô cổ,
22 Tháng Mười Một 202010:24 CH(Xem: 209)
Gần đây tôi có dịp quen biết một người phụ nữ khá lớn tuổi, bà này thường tỏ ra thương hại bạn bè khi thấy họ lúc nào cũng bận tâm lo lắng đến tiền bạc, ngay cả lúc mà cái chết đã gần kề. Bà bảo rằng: "Chưa hề có ai thấy một chiếc két sắt đặt trên một cỗ quan tài bao giờ cả !". Như vậy thì chúng ta sẽ nên lưu lại cho con cháu mình
21 Tháng Mười Một 20206:28 CH(Xem: 235)
Mười bốn câu trích dẫn lời của Đức Phật dưới đây được chọn trong số 34 câu đã được đăng tải trên trang mạng của báo Le Monde, một tổ hợp báo chí uy tínlâu đời của nước Pháp. Một số câu được trích nguyên văn từ các bài kinh, trong trường hợp này nguồn gốc của các câu trích dẫn đó sẽ được ghi chú rõ ràng, trái lại các câu
20 Tháng Mười Một 20201:53 CH(Xem: 216)
Điều trước nhất, ta nên thấy được sự khác biệt giữa một cái đau nơi thân với phản ứng của tâm đối với cái đau ấy. Mặc dù thân và tâm có mối liên hệ rất mật thiết với nhau, nhưng tâm ta không nhất thiết phải chịu cùng chung một số phận với thân. Khi thân có một cơn đau, tâm ta có thể lùi ra xa một chút. Thay vì bị lôi kéo vào, tâm ta có thể
19 Tháng Mười Một 20206:34 CH(Xem: 302)
Khi tôi viết về đề tài sống với cái đau, tôi không cần phải dùng đến trí tưởng tượng. Từ năm 1976, tôi bị khổ sở với một chứng bệnh nhức đầu kinh niên và nó tăng dần thêm theo năm tháng. Tình trạng này cũng giống như có ai đó khiêng một tảng đá hoa cương thật to chặn ngay trên con đường tu tập của tôi. Cơn đau ấy thường xóa trắng
18 Tháng Mười Một 20206:45 CH(Xem: 241)
Bài viết dưới đây, nguyên gốc là tài liệu hướng dẫn thực hành Phật Pháp, được phổ biến nội bộ trong một nhóm học Phật. Nhóm này có khoảng 10 thành viên nồng cốt, thường cùng nhau tu tập vào mỗi chiều tối thứ Sáu tại gia, về sau được đổi qua mỗi sáng thứ Bảy do đa phần anh chị em trong nhóm đã nghỉ hưu. Qua cơn bão dịch
14 Tháng Mười Một 20202:41 CH(Xem: 269)
Từ khổ đau đến chấm dứt khổ đau cách nhau bao xa? Khoảng cách ấy ta có thể vượt qua chỉ trong một chớp mắt. Đó là lời Phật dạy trong kinh Tu Tập Căn (Indriyabhavana Sutta), bài kinh cuối của Trung Bộ Kinh, số 152. Trong một trao đổi với một người đệ tử của Bà la môn tên Uttara, đức Phật mở đầu bằng sự diễn tả một kinh nghiệm
13 Tháng Mười Một 20208:24 CH(Xem: 280)
- Trong các kinh điển có nhiều định nghĩa khác nhau nhưng chữ Niết Bàn (Nirvana) không ngoài những nghĩa Viên tịch (hoàn toàn vắng lặng), Vô sanh (không còn sanh diệt) và Giải thoát v.v... những nghĩa này nhằm chỉ cho người đạt đạo sống trong trạng thái tâm thể hoàn toàn vắng lặng, dứt hết vọng tưởng vô minh.
12 Tháng Mười Một 20207:33 CH(Xem: 264)
Tại sao người hiền lành lại gặp phải tai ương? Câu hỏi này đặc biệt thích hợp khi áp dụng vào bối cảnh đại dịch Covid-19 đang diễn ra. Bệnh Covid-19 không chừa một ai, từ người giầu có đến người nghèo, từ người quyền quý đến người bình dân, từ người khỏe mạnh đến người yếu đuối. Tuy nhiên, ngay cả trong đời sống hàng ngày,
11 Tháng Mười Một 202011:43 CH(Xem: 265)
Có một anh thương gia cưới một người vợ xinh đẹp. Họ sống với nhau và sinh ra một bé trai kháu khỉnh. Nhưng người vợ lại ngã bịnh và mất sau đó, người chồng bất hạnh dồn tất cả tình thương vào đứa con. Đứa bé trở thành nguồn vui và hạnh phúc duy nhất của anh. Một hôm, vì việc buôn bán anh phải rời khỏi nhà, có một bọn cướp
10 Tháng Mười Một 20208:33 CH(Xem: 581)
Sáng nay, Thánh Đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma đã viết thư cho Joe Biden để chúc mừng Ông được bầu làm Tổng thống tiếp theo của Hợp chủng quốc Hoa Kỳ. Ngài viết: “Như có lẽ bạn đã biết, từ lâu tôi đã ngưỡng mộ Hoa Kỳ như một nền tảng của sự tự do, dân chủ, tự do tôn giáo và pháp quyền. Nhân loại đã đặt niềm hy vọng lớn lao vào tầm nhìn
09 Tháng Mười Một 20208:19 CH(Xem: 301)
Có một chuyện kể trong Phật giáo như sau, có một vị tăng nhân cứu được mạng sống của một người thanh niên tự sát. Người thanh niên sau khi tỉnh dậy, nói với vị tăng nhân: “Cảm ơn đại sư, nhưng xin ngài đừng phí sức cứu tôi bởi vì tôi đã quyết định không sống nữa rồi. Hôm nay cho dù không chết thì ngày mai tôi cũng vẫn chết”.
08 Tháng Mười Một 20207:59 CH(Xem: 369)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, tác giả quyển sách này là một nữ cư sĩ Thái lan. Chữ upasika trong tiếng Pa-li và tiếng Phạn có nghĩa là một cư sĩ phụ nữ. Thật thế, bà là một người tự tu tậpsuốt đời chỉ tự nhận mình là một người tu hành thế tục, thế nhưng giới tu hành
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 2202)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 3903)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 5530)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
19 Tháng Mười Một 20206:34 CH(Xem: 302)
Khi tôi viết về đề tài sống với cái đau, tôi không cần phải dùng đến trí tưởng tượng. Từ năm 1976, tôi bị khổ sở với một chứng bệnh nhức đầu kinh niên và nó tăng dần thêm theo năm tháng. Tình trạng này cũng giống như có ai đó khiêng một tảng đá hoa cương thật to chặn ngay trên con đường tu tập của tôi. Cơn đau ấy thường xóa trắng
08 Tháng Mười Một 20207:59 CH(Xem: 369)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, tác giả quyển sách này là một nữ cư sĩ Thái lan. Chữ upasika trong tiếng Pa-li và tiếng Phạn có nghĩa là một cư sĩ phụ nữ. Thật thế, bà là một người tự tu tậpsuốt đời chỉ tự nhận mình là một người tu hành thế tục, thế nhưng giới tu hành
06 Tháng Mười Một 202011:19 CH(Xem: 403)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, còn được biết đến qua bút danh, K. Khao-suan-luang, là một vị nữ Pháp sư nổi tiếng nhất trong thế kỷ 20 ở Thái Lan. Sinh năm 1901, trong một gia đình thương nhân Trung Hoa ở Rajburi (một thành phố ở phía Tây Bangkok), bà là con cả
23 Tháng Mười Một 202010:04 CH(Xem: 215)
Thầy Xá Lợi Phất - anh cả trong giáo đoàn - có dạy một kinh gọi là Kinh Thủy Dụ mà chúng ta có thể học hôm nay. Kinh này giúp chúng ta quán chiếu để đối trị hữu hiệu cái giận. Kinh Thủy Dụ là một kinh trong bộ Trung A Hàm. Thủy là nước. Khi khát ta cần nước để uống, khi nóng bức ta cần nước để tắm gội. Những lúc khát khô cổ,
22 Tháng Mười 20201:00 CH(Xem: 5343)
Tuy nhiên đối với thiền sinh hay ít ra những ai đang hướng về chân trời rực rỡ ánh hồng giải thoát, có thể nói Kinh Đại Niệm Xứbài kinh thỏa thích nhất hay đúng hơn là bài kinh tối cần, gần gũi nhất. Tối cần như cốt tủy và gần gũi như máu chảy khắp châu thân. Những lời kinh như những lời thiên thu gọi hãy dũng mãnh lên đường
21 Tháng Mười 202010:42 CH(Xem: 463)
Một lần Đấng Thế Tôn ngụ tại tu viện của Cấp Cô Độc (Anathapindita) nơi khu vườn Kỳ Đà Lâm (Jeta) gần thị trấn Xá Vệ (Savatthi). Vào lúc đó có một vị Bà-la-môn to béo và giàu sang đang chuẩn bị để chủ tế một lễ hiến sinh thật to. Số súc vật sắp bị giết gồm năm trăm con bò mộng, năm trăm con bê đực, năm trăm con bò cái tơ,
20 Tháng Mười 20209:07 CH(Xem: 466)
Tôi sinh ra trong một gia đình thấp hèn, Cực khổ, dăm bữa đói một bữa no. Sinh sống với một nghề hèn mọn: Quét dọn và nhặt hoa héo rơi xuống từ các bệ thờ (của những người Bà-la-môn). Chẳng ai màng đến tôi, mọi người khinh miệt và hay rầy mắng tôi, Hễ gặp ai thì tôi cũng phải cúi đầu vái lạy. Thế rồi một hôm, tôi được diện kiến
14 Tháng Mười 202010:00 SA(Xem: 2991)
Một thời Đức Phật ở chùa Kỳ Viên thuộc thành Xá Vệ do Cấp Cô Độc phát tâm hiến cúng. Bấy giờ, Bāhiya là một người theo giáo phái Áo Vải, sống ở vùng đất Suppāraka ở cạnh bờ biển. Ông là một người được thờ phụng, kính ngưỡng, ngợi ca, tôn vinh và kính lễ. Ông là một người lỗi lạc, được nhiều người thần phục.
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 2002)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng