[1. Introduction]

12 Tháng Sáu 20206:00 CH(Xem: 239)
[1. Introduction]

SongThien_ALiving Meditation, Living Insight, The Path of Mindfulness in Daily Life
Sống Thiền, Đạo Lý Tỉnh Giác Trong Đời Sống Thường Ngày
Dr. Thynn Thynn - Từ Thám dịch (Sydney, Australia - 2001)
Source-Nguồn: buddhanet.net, budsas.org, quangduc.com
 
____________________


1. Introduction

 

 

Foreword

 

I am very impressed by the thoroughness and care with which Dr. Thynn Thynn explains the path of mindfulness in daily life in her book. This has not been emphasized as strongly in the monastic and meditative teachings of Buddhism that have taken root in the West. In fact, much of Buddhist practice in Asia has followed the intensive model. But clearly, that will not work for those of us who are householders in the West. And anyway, the wonderful experiences of intensive practice often lead to less transformation of our lives than we might hope, so that after intensive meditation practice we are back again in the midst of our lives with the question of how to bring the Dhamma to bear in everyday life. I am so pleased when I see a book like Dr. Thynn Thynn's that speaks directly to this situation.

 

I applaud her clarity and courage for teaching in the straightforward way that she does.

 

Jack Kornfield
Spirit Rock Center
Woodacre, California
July 1992

 


 

Introduction

 

Years ago when I came to Thynn-Thynn's small Dharma group in Bangkok, I was a newcomer to Buddhism. Thynn-Thynn opened the door to her home and welcomed me with warm eyes and an infectious laugh. Several of her friends joined us and began asking her questions about Buddhism. Smiling, she answered them in a casual way, often using personal anecdotes.

 

As the years went by, the group grew. Friends invited their curious friends to come. Thynn-Thynn responded by offering more structured sessions. We literally sat at her feet as she gave a discourse, drew diagrams, and defined Pali terms. After a lunch filled with laughter and talk, we met again for lively discussions. Someone would ask for clarification of a point. The discussion would roll around to: How can I apply this in my life? How will it help me be mindful around my little toddlers? How can I practice equanimity with my rebellious teenagers? How can I share this with a closed-minded spouse? How can I be more compassionate to a friend in need?

 

Thynn-Thynn would gently offer, in a soft voice, her insights. Rather than suggest a specific solution, she would propose a Dharma way of looking at a problem. The questioner would return home and try "stopping and looking" and "letting go." That was our practice. Go home and try it out.

 

Over the years, we became a support group, but one with a difference. The Dharma propelled us forward in our lives; it held us together as a group. It wasn't always easy. We were all so different -- or so we thought at first. We came from many countries -- Burma, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Switzerland, Russia and the United States. We were an eclectic mix of religious backgrounds -- Buddhist, Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Muslim and atheist. And we had very different personalities -- devotional, intellectual, artistic, out-going and contemplative. In a sense, we were speaking different languages: the logic of the intellectual left the devotional unmoved; dramatic insights overwhelmed those with more reserved temperaments. Sometimes sparks would fly at meetings. But Thynn-Thynn leavened these delicate situations with her ready humor and perceptive awareness. The social interactions within the group itself also became part of our practice.

 

Going one step further, Thynn-Thynn customized the practice for each of us. She matched, point for point, the heated arguments of the intellectual. She urged artists to delight in the beauty of the moment. Nurturing each person's natural tendencies, she encouraged each person to open up and blossom. Acutely sensitive to each person's needs, Thynn-Thynn sought to balance our rigid conditioning. She prodded the lazy, shocked the arrogant, and relaxed the compulsive. In doing so, she revealed many different paths to understanding.

 

Gradually, each of us softened into Buddhism. We found we smiled more, laughed more and loved more. We slowed down and had glimpses of things as they are.

 

Recently, Thynn-Thynn has moved to the United States; new friends gather around, eager to learn the Dharma and apply it to their daily lives. The Bangkok group still continues. Those of us who were in the original group remain friends and continue to practice, although we are separated by years and miles. Despite our differences, we found we have a lasting commitment to living the Dharma, and an abiding love for the woman who showed us it can be done.

 

Pam Taylor

 


 

Preface to the Second Edition

 

Ten years ago, when our small Dhamma group started to meet in Bangkok, I was inspired to write about the many questions that arose. The articles compiled in this book came out of those many discussions. As I wrote, I gave these articles to Dhamma friends to help them digest the Dhammic point of view and encourage them in their spiritual quests.

 

I wrote the articles to encourage practitioners learning to meditate in daily life. In this sense, the articles are presented as a "hands-on" or, more accurately, a "minds-on" training manual. Although I discuss meditation in general, the real focus is on how the Dhamma brings us into spontaneous, wholesome and creative living.

 

This book is primarily for beginners in meditation. I have used theory and Pali terms sparingly. The emphasis is on the process and insights into the nature of the mind. My objective in presenting the articles is to help the aspirant build up a solid foundation of mindfulness as a way of life rather than as a practice separated from daily living. For those who have been practicing meditation in the formal way, this approach can help them incorporate their mindfulness practice into everyday experience. The process of mindfulness is the same, except in one important aspect: instead of sitting down, closing the eyes and watching the mind, the practice is done while attending to everyday business.

 

After the first edition of this book came out in 1992, I received comments to the effect that my teaching style is similar to Krishnamurti and Zen. When someone once mentioned it to my friend, the Theravada nun Shinma Dhammadina, she replied, "That's because her teachers' teachings are very much like Krishnamurti and Zen."

 

My teachers are Burmese abbots, Sayadaw U Eindasara of Rangoon and Sayadaw U Awthada of Henzada. They are Theravada monks, but teach the Dhamma in a very unorthodox and dynamic fashion. They veer away from the emphasis on the traditional form of "sitting" meditation, and instead strongly emphasize "looking directly within and practicing mindfulness in everyday life."

 

I was very much attracted to this approach because of its simplicity, directness and practicality in daily life. Just before I met my teachers in 1973, I had meditated briefly in the traditional sitting style at the Mahasi Meditation Center in Rangoon with the late Sayadaw U Zawana. After a few sessions with him, I began to realize I was automatically becoming aware of my feelings in daily life and was becoming much calmer without formal "sitting in meditation." I discovered that as soon as I focused on my feelings they would drop away very quickly. Then, through some good Dhamma friends, I found out about my teachers' method of finding peace of mind by stopping and looking at the mind, moment by moment, in daily life as a form of meditation practice. I felt immediately drawn to this style of teaching since I was experiencing exactly what these teachers taught.

 

When I met my teachers, I was struck by the Sayadaws' profound wisdom and their innovative style of teaching. Their liberal interpretation of Theravada Buddhism is rarely found in traditional Buddhist Myanmar. Their teachings may sound similar to Krishnamurti's, in an attempt to break down the mind from all conditioning to its ultimate freedom, but what is striking in the approach of the Sayadaws is that they provide a means to reassimilate the relative with a new insightful perspective. They are also exceptionally skillful in providing hands-on training which is similar to a direct transmission in the Zen tradition. This is probably why my book may appear to some as an integration of Theravada Buddhism, Krishnamurti and Zen. My teachers have not been Western-educated, and came to know about Krishnamurti and Zen only when we, their students, introduced them to these teachings. It is thus interesting to see the confluence of such apparently disparate approaches to spiritual truth in such an unlikely manner.

 

I am often asked what my teachers were like. They are actually an unlikely pair. Sayadaw U Eindasara is a profound mystic and poet and the quieter one of the pair. We fondly call him "the laughing Buddha." He rarely appears or talks in public but devotes extraordinary energy to working with his students. Sayadaw U Awthada is brilliant and quick-witted and we called him "the Burmese Zen Master" in recognition of his Zen-like ability to tie up his students in knots and push them beyond the intellect.

 

These teachers invite comparisons with Krishnamurti in that they live a very simple life, without seeking followers, without setting up any institutions or organizations, and keeping away from publicity and fame. They still live and teach within the confines of monkhood, yet maintain an integrity and openness rarely found in Buddhist Asia.

 

I had the good fortune to study closely with these two remarkable teachers and I remember with fondness and gratitude the time I spent training with them. They thought I was a little tricky, as I would continuously bring people from all walks of life to be exposed to their teaching first-hand. From such close encounters I have the privilege now to share my experiences with members of my Dhamma groups and also, through this book, with many others. To these two teachers, I bow in great reverence; I also bow down to my guru, Shwe Baw Byun Sayadaw, for his kind support for this book and for my Dhamma work in the West.

 

Thynn Thynn
Scarsdale
, New York
, 1995

 


 

Acknowledgements

 

I am deeply indebted to my dearest Dhamma friend, Pam Taylor, who was the very first person to suggest that I should get my writings published, and who also took it upon herself to better organize my random writing and restructure it into a manuscript. Without her valiant efforts and superb editing, my manuscript would still be lying on a shelf in my basement. My thanks also go to Marcia Hamilton, who edited the first draft manuscript, and to Ashin U Tay Zaw Batha, who edited the text. Then it was my illustrious husband, Dr. San Lin, who succeeded in nudging me to complete the manuscript and who was enormously helpful in preparing the final version.

 

It is not only to my husband, but to my wonderful children, Win and Tet, that I owe many insights into myself, human nature and family life. Many friends ask me what my meditation is and I always reply, "My family is my meditation." It is mostly through my family that I have learned to practice what I preach. It is the family that compels me to sharpen my wits, to train and retrain my own mindfulness. In fact, my family is my greatest challenge and training ground.

 

I am very grateful to my old Dhamma friends from Bangkok for the memorable and joyous times I had with them and for their candid and challenging questions which resulted in this book.

 

Many thanks to John Hein and Charlotte Richardson for their careful editing and revising, to Nee Nee Myint for retyping, and to David Babski for formatting the manuscript.

 

Lastly, I would like to thank John Bullitt for putting it on-line.



____________________




Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
09 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 121)
28 Tháng Hai 2020(Xem: 1055)
13 Tháng Bảy 20209:41 CH(Xem: 18)
Kính Thầy! Con xuất giatu học bên Bắc Tông. Trước đây con đã nghĩ đơn giản Nam TôngTiểu thừa, Bắc TôngĐại thừa; Nam Tông ăn mặn, Bắc Tông ăn chay; Nam Tông tụng kinh tiếng Pali không hiểu được, Bắc Tông tụng kinh tiếng Việt có vẻ thực tế hơn. Con không tìm hiểu thấu đáo mà còn cho rằng mình thật có phước,
08 Tháng Bảy 20209:02 CH(Xem: 126)
"Tôi nghĩ rằng chúng ta nên nhấn mạnh đến sự đồng nhất, sự giống nhau ... nhấn mạnh đến điều đó", nhà sư đoạt giải Nobel Hòa bình nói. Đôi khi, ông nói, chúng ta đặt nặng quá nhiều vào "sự khác biệt nhỏ" và "điều đó tạo ra vấn đề". ("I think we should emphasize oneness, sameness...emphasize that," says the Nobel Peace Prize winning monk.
07 Tháng Bảy 202010:00 CH(Xem: 191)
Trong thế giới chúng ta sống hôm nay, các quốc gia không còn cô lập và tự cung cấp như xưa kia. Tất cả chúng ta trở nên phụ thuộc nhau nhiều hơn. Vì thế, càng phải nhận thức nhiều hơn về tính nhân loại đồng nhất. Việc quan tâm đến người khác là quan tâm chính mình. Khí hậu thay đổi và đại dịch hiện nay, tất cả chúng ta bị đe doạ,
05 Tháng Bảy 20208:28 CH(Xem: 210)
Tâm biết có hai phương diện: Tánh biết và tướng biết. Tánh biết vốn không sinh diệt, còn tướng biết tuỳ đối tượng mà có sinh diệt. Khi khởi tâm muốn biết tức đã rơi vào tướng biết sinh diệt. Khi tâm rỗng lặng hồn nhiên, tướng biết không dao động thì tánh biết tự soi sáng. Lúc đó tánh biết và tướng biết tương thông,
04 Tháng Bảy 20202:37 CH(Xem: 206)
Từ yoniso nghĩa là sáng suốt, đúng đắn. Manasikāra nghĩa là sự chú ý. Khi nào chú ý đúng đắn hợp với chánh đạo, đó là như lý tác ý; khi nào chú ý không đúng đắn, hợp với tà đạo, đó là phi như lý tác ý. Khi chú ý đến các pháp khiến cho năm triền cái phát sanh là phi như lý tác ý, trái lại khi chú ý đến các pháp mà làm hiện khởi
03 Tháng Bảy 20207:32 CH(Xem: 199)
Trước hết cần xác định “tác ý” được dịch từ manasikāra hay từ cetanā, vì đôi lúc cả hai thuật ngữ Pāli này đều được dịch là tác ý như nhau. Khi nói “như lý tác ý” hoặc “phi như tác ý” thì biết đó là manasikāra, còn khi nói “tác ý thiện” hoặc “tác ý bất thiện” thì đó là cetanā. Nếu nghi ngờ một thuật ngữ Phật học Hán Việt thì nên tra lại
02 Tháng Bảy 20206:13 CH(Xem: 249)
Bạn nói là bạn quá bận rộn để thực tập thiền. Bạn có thời gian để thở không? Thiền chính là hơi thở. Tại sao bạn có thì giờ để thở mà lại không có thì giờ để thiền? Hơi thở là thiết yếu cho đời sống. Nếu bạn thấy rằng tu tập Phật pháp là thiết yếu trong cuộc đời, bạn sẽ thấy hơi thởtu tập Phật pháp là quan trọng như nhau.
01 Tháng Bảy 20205:53 CH(Xem: 257)
Khi con biết chiêm nghiệm những trải nghiệm cuộc sống, con sẽ thấy ra ý nghĩa đích thực của khổ đau và ràng buộc thì con sẽ có thể dễ dàng tự do tự tại trong đó. Thực ra khổ đau và ràng buộc chỉ xuất phát từ thái độ của tâm con hơn là từ điều kiện bên ngoài. Nếu con tìm thấy nguyên nhân sinh khổ đau ràng buộc ở trong thái độ tâm
30 Tháng Sáu 20209:07 CH(Xem: 247)
Cốt lõi của đạo Phật khác với các tôn giáo khác ở chỗ, hầu hết các tôn giáo khác đều đưa ra mục đích rồi rèn luyện hay tu luyện để trở thành, để đạt được lý tưởng nào đó. Còn đạo Phật không tu luyện để đạt được cái gì cả. Mục đích của đạo Phậtgiác ngộ, thấy ra sự thật hiện tiền tức cái đang là. Tất cả sự thật đều bình đẳng,
29 Tháng Sáu 20208:36 CH(Xem: 249)
Theo nguyên lý thì tụng gì không thành vấn đề, miễn khi tụng tập trung được tâm ý thì đều có năng lực. Sự tập trung này phần lớn có được nhờ đức tin vào tha lực. Luyện bùa, trì Chú, thôi miên, niệm Phật, niệm Chúa, thiền định, thần thông v.v… cũng đều cần có sức mạnh tập trung mới thành tựu. Tưởng đó là nhờ tha lực nhưng sức mạnh
28 Tháng Sáu 20209:36 CH(Xem: 254)
Giác ngộvô minh thì thấy vô minh, minh thì thấy minh… mỗi mỗi đều là những cái biểu hiện để giúp tâm thấy ra tất cả vốn đã hoàn hảo ngay trong chính nó. Cho nên chỉ cần sống bình thường và thấy ra nguyên lý của Pháp thôi. Sự vận hành của Pháp vốn rất hoàn hảo trong những cặp đối đãi – tương sinh tương khắc – của nó.
27 Tháng Sáu 20206:31 CH(Xem: 257)
Thầy có ví dụ: Trong vườn, cây quýt nhìn qua thấy cây cam nói nói tại sao trái cam to hơn mình. Và nó ước gì nó thành cây cam rồi nó quên hút nước và chết. Mình thường hay muốn thành cái khác, đó là cái sai. Thứ hai là mình muốn đốt thời gian. Như cây ổi, mình cứ lo tưới nước đi. Mọi chuyện hãy để Pháp làm. Mình thận trọng,
26 Tháng Sáu 20209:57 CH(Xem: 237)
Từ đó tôi mới hiểu ý-nghĩa này. Hóa ra trong kinh có nói những cái nghĩa đen, những cái nghĩa bóng. Có nghĩa là khi một người được sinh ra trên thế-gian này, dù người đó là Phật, là phàm-phu, là thánh-nhân đi nữa, ít nhất đầu tiên chúng ta cũng bị tắm bởi hai dòng nước, lạnh và nóng, tức là Nghịch và Thuận; nếu qua được
25 Tháng Sáu 202010:14 CH(Xem: 286)
trí nhớ là tốt nhưng đôi khi nhớ quá nhiều chữ nghĩa cũng không hay ho gì, nên quên bớt ngôn từ đi, chỉ cần nắm được (thấy ra, thực chứng) cốt lõi lý và sự thôi lại càng tốt. Thấy ra cốt lõi tinh tuý của sự thật mới có sự sáng tạo. Nếu nhớ từng lời từng chữ - tầm chương trích cú - như mọt sách rồi nhìn mọi sự mọi vật qua lăng kính
24 Tháng Sáu 202010:08 CH(Xem: 291)
Kính thưa Thầy, là một người Phật Tử, mỗi khi đi làm phước hay dâng cúng một lễ vật gì đến Chư Tăng thì mình có nên cầu nguyện để mong được như ý mà mình mong muốn không? Hay là để tâm trong sạch cung kính mà dâng cúng không nên cầu nguyện một điều gì? Và khi làm phước mà mong được gieo giống lành đắc Đạo quả
23 Tháng Sáu 20207:24 CH(Xem: 322)
Tất cả chúng ta sẽ phải đối mặt với cái chết, vì vậy, không nên bỏ mặc nó. Việc có cái nhìn thực tế về cái chết của mình sẽ giúp ta sống một đời trọn vẹn, có ý nghĩa. Thay vì hấp hối trong sự sợ hãi thì ta có thể chết một cách hạnh phúc, vì đã tận dụng tối đa cuộc sống của mình. Qua nhiều năm thì cơ thể của chúng ta đã thay đổi.
22 Tháng Sáu 20209:23 CH(Xem: 348)
Đúng là không nên nhầm lẫn giữa luân hồi (saṃsāra) và tái sinh (nibbatti). Tái sinh là sự vận hành tự nhiên của vạn vật (pháp hữu vi), đó là sự chết đi và sinh lại. Phàm cái gì do duyên sinh thì cũng đều do duyên diệt, và rồi sẽ tái sinh theo duyên kế tục, như ví dụ trong câu hỏi là ngọn lửa từ bật lửa chuyển thành ngọn lửa
21 Tháng Sáu 20208:58 CH(Xem: 298)
Trong Tăng chi bộ, có một lời kinh về bản chất chân thật của tâm: “Tâm này, này các Tỷ-kheo, là sáng chói, nhưng bị ô nhiễm bởi các cấu uế từ ngoài vào” cùng với ý nghĩa “cội nguồn” của “yoni” trong “yoniso mananikara” là hai y cứ cho tựa sách “Chói sáng cội nguồn tâm”. Tựa đề phụ “Cách nhìn toàn diện hai chiều vô vihữu vi của thực tại”
20 Tháng Sáu 20203:42 CH(Xem: 366)
Trong tu tập nhiều hành giả thường cố gắng sắp đặt cái gì đó trước cho việc hành trì của mình, như phải ngồi thế này, giữ Tâm thế kia, để mong đạt được thế nọ… nhưng thật ra không phải như vậy, mà là cứ sống bình thường trong đời sống hàng ngày, ngay đó biết quan sát mà thấy ra và học cách hành xử sao cho đúng tốt là được.
19 Tháng Sáu 20204:48 CH(Xem: 374)
Lúc còn nhỏ, khi đến thiền viện, tôi phải có cha mẹ đi cùng, và không được đi hay ngồi chung với các sư. Khi các sư giảng Pháp, tôi luôn ngồi bên dưới, chỉ đủ tầm để nghe. Vị thiền sư đáng kính dạy chúng tôi cách đảnh lễ Đức Phậttụng kinh xưng tán ân đức của Ngài. Thiền sư khuyến khích chúng tôi rải tâm từ cho mọi chúng sinh,
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 1297)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 2866)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 4377)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
12 Tháng Bảy 20201:49 CH(Xem: 79)
Hành trình về phương đông của giáo sư Spalding kể chuyện một đoàn khoa học gồm các chuyên môn khác nhau Hội Khoa học Hoàng gia Anh (tức Viện Hàn lâm Khoa học) cử sang Ấn Độ nghiên cứu về “huyền học”. Sau hai năm trời lang thang khắp các đền chùa Ấn Độ, chứng kiến nhiều cảnh mê tín dị đoan, thậm chí “làm tiền” du khách,
11 Tháng Bảy 20209:48 CH(Xem: 71)
Tâm hồn con người hiện nay đã trở nên quá máy móc, thụ động, không thể tự chữa phải được nâng lên một bình diện khác cao hơn để mở rộng ra, nhìn mọi sự qua một nhãn quan mới. Chỉ có áp dụng cách đó việc chữa trị mới mang lại kết quả tốt đẹp được.” [Trang 13] Những câu chữ trích dẫn nói trên chính là quan điểm của tác giả,
10 Tháng Bảy 20208:57 CH(Xem: 74)
Ngay trong phần đầu cuốn sách, tác giả Swami Amar Jyoti đã “khuyến cáo” rằng “Cuốn sách này không phải là hồi ký, vì các nhân vật đều không có thực. Tuy nhiên, đây cũng không phải một tiểu thuyết hư cấu vì nó tiêu biểu cho những giai đoạn đi tìm đạo vẫn thường xảy ra tại Ấn Độ suốt mấy ngàn năm nay”. Và tác giả hy vọng “cuốn sách
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 675)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng
08 Tháng Năm 202010:32 CH(Xem: 673)
"Này Rahula, cũng tương tự như vậy, bất kỳ ai dù không cảm thấy xấu hổ khi cố tình nói dối, thì điều đó cũng không có nghĩa là không làm một điều xấu xa. Ta bảo với con rằng người ấy [dù không xấu hổ đi nữa nhưng cũng không phải vì thế mà] không tạo ra một điều xấu xa.
28 Tháng Tư 202010:41 CH(Xem: 788)
Kinh Thừa Tự Pháp (Dhammadāyāda Sutta) là một lời dạy hết sức quan trọng của Đức Phật đáng được những người có lòng tôn trọng Phật Pháp lưu tâm một cách nghiêm túc. Vì cốt lõi của bài kinh Đức Phật khuyên các đệ tử của ngài nên tránh theo đuổi tài sản vật chất và hãy tìm kiếm sự thừa tự pháp qua việc thực hành Bát Chánh Đạo.
04 Tháng Ba 20209:20 CH(Xem: 1100)
Chàng kia nuôi một bầy dê. Đúng theo phương pháp, tay nghề giỏi giang. Nên dê sinh sản từng đàn. Từ ngàn con đến chục ngàn rất mau. Nhưng chàng hà tiện hàng đầu. Không hề dám giết con nào để ăn. Hoặc là đãi khách đến thăm. Dù ai năn nỉ cũng bằng thừa thôi
11 Tháng Hai 20206:36 SA(Xem: 1299)
Kinh Thập Thiện là một quyển kinh nhỏ ghi lại buổi thuyết pháp của Phật cho cả cư sĩ lẫn người xuất gia, hoặc cho các loài thủy tộc nhẫn đến bậc A-la-hán và Bồ-tát. Xét hội chúng dự buổi thuyết pháp này, chúng ta nhận định được giá trị quyển kinh thế nào rồi. Pháp Thập thiện là nền tảng đạo đức, cũng là nấc thang đầu
09 Tháng Hai 20204:17 CH(Xem: 1174)
Quyển “Kinh Bốn Mươi Hai Chương Giảng Giải” được hình thành qua hai năm ghi chép, phiên tả với lòng chân thành muốn phổ biến những lời Phật dạy. Đầu tiên đây là những buổi học dành cho nội chúng Tu viện Lộc Uyển, sau đó lan dần đến những cư sĩ hữu duyên.