[02] Chapter 11 -> Chapter 20, Verse 146 -> Verse 289

16 Tháng Mười Một 202010:34 CH(Xem: 72)
[02] Chapter 11 -> Chapter 20, Verse 146 -> Verse 289


TheDhammapada_AB_1The Dhammapada: The Buddha's Path Of Wisdom (AB)
Kinh Pháp Cú, Minh Họa (TM-NTG)
Translated By: Acharya Buddharakkhita
Chuyển Dịch Thơ: Tâm Minh Ngô Tằng Giao
Illustrations by - Tranh Vẽ: Mr. P. Wickramanayaka
Source-Nguồn: accesstoinsight.org, buddhanet.net, budsas.org

 

____________________


[02] Chapter 11 -> Chapter 20, Verse 146 -> Verse 289 

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 11, Jaravagga: Old Age - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 11, Phẩm Già

 (Verses 146-156 - Kệ 146-156)

 

146. When this world is ever ablaze, why this laughter, why this jubilation? Shrouded in darkness, will you not see the light?

 

147. Behold this body — a painted image, a mass of heaped up sores, infirm, full of hankering — of which nothing is lasting or stable!

 

148. Fully worn out is this body, a nest of disease, and fragile. This foul mass breaks up, for death is the end of life.

 

149. These dove-colored bones are like gourds that lie scattered about in autumn. Having seen them, how can one seek delight?

 

150. This city (body) is built of bones, plastered with flesh and blood; within are decay and death, pride and jealousy.

 

151. Even gorgeous royal chariots wear out, and indeed this body too wears out. But the Dhamma of the Good does not age; thus the Good make it known to the good.

 

152. The man of little learning grows old like a bull. He grows only in bulk, but, his wisdom does not grow.

 

153. Through many a birth in samsara have I wandered in vain, seeking the builder of this house (of life). Repeated birth is indeed suffering!

 

154. O house-builder, you are seen! You will not build this house again. For your rafters are broken and your ridgepole shattered. My mind has reached the Unconditioned; I have attained the destruction of craving. [13]

 

13.

(vv. 153-154) According to the commentary, these verses are the Buddha's "Song of Victory," his first utterance after his Enlightenment. The house is individualized existence in samsara, the house-builder craving, the rafters the passions and the ridge-pole ignorance.

 

155. Those who in youth have not led the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, languish like old cranes in the pond without fish.

 

156. Those who in youth have not lead the holy life, or have failed to acquire wealth, lie sighing over the past, like worn out arrows (shot from) a bow.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 12, Attavagga: The Self - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 12, Phẩm Chính Mình

 (Verses 157-166 - Kệ 157-166)

 

157. If one holds oneself dear, one should diligently watch oneself. Let the wise man keep vigil during any of the three watches of the night.

 

158. One should first establish oneself in what is proper; then only should one instruct others. Thus the wise man will not be reproached.

 

159. One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well controlled oneself. Difficult, indeed, is self-control.

 

160. One truly is the protector of oneself; who else could the protector be? With oneself fully controlled, one gains a mastery that is hard to gain.

 

161. The evil a witless man does by himself, born of himself and produced by himself, grinds him as a diamond grinds a hard gem.

 

162. Just as a single creeper strangles the tree on which it grows, even so, a man who is exceedingly depraved harms himself as only an enemy might wish.

 

163. Easy to do are things that are bad and harmful to oneself. But exceedingly difficult to do are things that are good and beneficial.

 

164. Whoever, on account of perverted views, scorns the Teaching of the Perfected Ones, the Noble and Righteous Ones — that fool, like the bamboo, produces fruits only for self destruction. [14]

 

14.

(v. 164) Certain reeds of the bamboo family perish immediately after producing fruits.

 

165. By oneself is evil done; by oneself is one defiled. By oneself is evil left undone; by oneself is one made pure. Purity and impurity depend on oneself; no one can purify another.

 

166. Let one not neglect one's own welfare for the sake of another, however great. Clearly understanding one's own welfare, let one be intent upon the good.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 13, Lokavagga: The World - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 13, Phẩm Thế Gian

 (Verses 167-178 - Kệ 167-178)

 

167. Follow not the vulgar way; live not in heedlessness; hold not false views; linger not long in worldly existence.

 

168. Arise! Do not be heedless! Lead a righteous life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next.

 

169. Lead a righteous life; lead not a base life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next.

 

170. One who looks upon the world as a bubble and a mirage, him the King of Death sees not.

 

171. Come! Behold this world, which is like a decorated royal chariot. Here fools flounder, but the wise have no attachment to it.

 

172. He who having been heedless is heedless no more, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds.

 

173. He, who by good deeds covers the evil he has done, illuminates this world like the moon freed from clouds.

 

174. Blind is the world; here only a few possess insight. Only a few, like birds escaping from the net, go to realms of bliss.

 

175. Swans fly on the path of the sun; men pass through the air by psychic powers; the wise are led away from the world after vanquishing Mara and his host.

 

176. For a liar who has violated the one law (of truthfulness) who holds in scorn the hereafter, there is no evil that he cannot do.

 

177. Truly, misers fare not to heavenly realms; nor, indeed, do fools praise generosity. But the wise man rejoices in giving, and by that alone does he become happy hereafter.

 

178. Better than sole sovereignty over the earth, better than going to heaven, better even than lordship over all the worlds is the supramundane Fruition of Stream Entrance. [15]

 

15.

(v. 178) Stream-entry (sotapatti): the first stage of supramundane attainment.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 14, Buddhavagga: The Buddha - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 14, Phẩm Đức Phật

 (Verses 179-196 - Kệ 179-196)

 

179. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, whose victory nothing can undo, whom none of the vanquished defilements can ever pursue?

 

180. By what track can you trace that trackless Buddha of limitless range, in whom exists no longer, the entangling and embroiling craving that perpetuates becoming?

 

181. Those wise ones who are devoted to meditation and who delight in the calm of renunciation — such mindful ones, Supreme Buddhas, even the gods hold dear.

 

182. Hard is it to be born a man; hard is the life of mortals. Hard is it to gain the opportunity of hearing the Sublime Truth, and hard to encounter is the arising of the Buddhas.

 

183. To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.

 

184. Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms another, nor a true renunciate who oppresses others.

 

185. Not despising, not harming, restraint according to the code of monastic discipline, moderation in food, dwelling in solitude, devotion to meditation — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.

 

186-187. There is no satisfying sensual desires, even with the rain of gold coins. For sensual pleasures give little satisfaction and much pain. Having understood this, the wise man finds no delight even in heavenly pleasures. The disciple of the Supreme Buddha delights in the destruction of craving.

 

188. Driven only by fear, do men go for refuge to many places — to hills, woods, groves, trees and shrines.

 

189. Such, indeed, is no safe refuge; such is not the refuge supreme. Not by resorting to such a refuge is one released from all suffering.

 

190-191. He who has gone for refuge to the Buddha, the Teaching and his Order, penetrates with transcendental wisdom the Four Noble Truths — suffering, the cause of suffering, the cessation of suffering, and the Noble Eightfold Path leading to the cessation of suffering. [16]

 

16.

(vv. 190-191) The Order: both the monastic Order (bhikkhu sangha) and the Order of Noble Ones (ariya sangha) who have reached the four supramundane stages.

 

192. This indeed is the safe refuge, this the refuge supreme. Having gone to such a refuge, one is released from all suffering.

 

193. Hard to find is the thoroughbred man (the Buddha); he is not born everywhere. Where such a wise man is born, that clan thrives happily.

 

194. Blessed is the birth of the Buddhas; blessed is the enunciation of the sacred Teaching; blessed is the harmony in the Order, and blessed is the spiritual pursuit of the united truth-seeker.

 

195-196. He who reveres those worthy of reverence, the Buddhas and their disciples, who have transcended all obstacles and passed beyond the reach of sorrow and lamentation — he who reveres such peaceful and fearless ones, his merit none can compute by any measure.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 15, Sukhavagga: Happiness - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 15, Phẩm An Lạc

 (Verses 197-208 - Kệ 197-208)

 

197. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the hostile. Amidst hostile men we dwell free from hatred.

 

198. Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the afflicted (by craving). Amidst afflicted men we dwell free from affliction.

 

199. Happy indeed we live, free from avarice amidst the avaricious. Amidst the avaricious men we dwell free from avarice.

 

200. Happy indeed we live, we who possess nothing. Feeders on joy we shall be, like the Radiant Gods.

 

201. Victory begets enmity; the defeated dwell in pain. Happily the peaceful live, discarding both victory and defeat.

 

202. There is no fire like lust and no crime like hatred. There is no ill like the aggregates (of existence) and no bliss higher than the peace (of Nibbana). [17]

 

17.

(v. 202) Aggregates (of existence) (khandha): the five groups of factors into which the Buddha analyzes the living being — material form, feeling, perception, mental formations, and consciousness.

 

203. Hunger is the worst disease, conditioned things the worst suffering. Knowing this as it really is, the wise realize Nibbana, the highest bliss.

 

204. Health is the most precious gain and contentment the greatest wealth. A trustworthy person is the best kinsman, Nibbana the highest bliss.

 

205. Having savored the taste of solitude and peace (of Nibbana), pain-free and stainless he becomes, drinking deep the taste of the bliss of the Truth.

 

206. Good is it to see the Noble Ones; to live with them is ever blissful. One will always be happy by not encountering fools.

 

207. Indeed, he who moves in the company of fools grieves for longing. Association with fools is ever painful, like partnership with an enemy. But association with the wise is happy, like meeting one's own kinsmen.

 

208. Therefore, follow the Noble One, who is steadfast, wise, learned, dutiful and devout. One should follow only such a man, who is truly good and discerning, even as the moon follows the path of the stars.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 16, Piyavagga: Affection - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 16, Phẩm Yêu Thích

 (Verses 209-220 - Kệ 209-220)

 

209. Giving himself to things to be shunned and not exerting where exertion is needed, a seeker after pleasures, having given up his true welfare, envies those intent upon theirs.

 

210. Seek no intimacy with the beloved and also not with the unloved, for not to see the beloved and to see the unloved, both are painful.

 

211. Therefore hold nothing dear, for separation from the dear is painful. There are no bonds for those who have nothing beloved or unloved.

 

212. From endearment springs grief, from endearment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from endearment there is no grief, whence then fear?

 

213. From affection springs grief, from affection springs fear. For one who is wholly free from affection there is no grief, whence then fear?

 

214. From attachment springs grief, from attachment springs fear. For one who is wholly free from attachment there is no grief, whence then fear?

 

215. From lust springs grief, from lust springs fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear?

 

216. From craving springs grief, from craving springs fear. For one who is wholly free from craving there is no grief; whence then fear?

 

217. People hold dear him who embodies virtue and insight, who is principled, has realized the truth, and who himself does what he ought to be doing.

 

218. One who is intent upon the Ineffable (Nibbana), dwells with mind inspired (by supramundane wisdom), and is no more bound by sense pleasures — such a man is called "One Bound Upstream." [18]

 

18.

(v. 218) One Bound Upstream: a non-returner (anagami).

 

219. When, after a long absence, a man safely returns from afar, his relatives, friends and well-wishers welcome him home on arrival.

 

220. As kinsmen welcome a dear one on arrival, even so his own good deeds will welcome the doer of good who has gone from this world to the next.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 17, Kodhavagga: Anger - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 17, Phẩm Phẫn Nộ

 (Verses 221-234 - Kệ 221-234)

 

221. One should give up anger, renounce pride, and overcome all fetters. Suffering never befalls him who clings not to mind and body and is detached.

 

222. He who checks rising anger as a charioteer checks a rolling chariot, him I call a true charioteer. Others only hold the reins.

 

223. Overcome the angry by non-anger; overcome the wicked by goodness; overcome the miser by generosity; overcome the liar by truth.

 

224. Speak the truth; yield not to anger; when asked, give even if you only have a little. By these three means can one reach the presence of the gods.

 

225. Those sages who are inoffensive and ever restrained in body, go to the Deathless State, where, having gone, they grieve no more.

 

226. Those who are ever vigilant, who discipline themselves day and night, and are ever intent upon Nibbana — their defilements fade away.

 

227. O Atula! Indeed, this is an ancient practice, not one only of today: they blame those who remain silent, they blame those who speak much, they blame those who speak in moderation. There is none in the world who is not blamed.

 

228. There never was, there never will be, nor is there now, a person who is wholly blamed or wholly praised.

 

229. But the man whom the wise praise, after observing him day after day, is one of flawless character, wise, and endowed with knowledge and virtue.

 

230. Who can blame such a one, as worthy as a coin of refined gold? Even the gods praise him; by Brahma, too, is he praised.

 

231. Let a man guard himself against irritability in bodily action; let him be controlled in deed. Abandoning bodily misconduct, let him practice good conduct in deed.

 

232. Let a man guard himself against irritability in speech; let him be controlled in speech. Abandoning verbal misconduct, let him practice good conduct in speech.

 

233. Let a man guard himself against irritability in thought; let him be controlled in mind. Abandoning mental misconduct, let him practice good conduct in thought.

 

234. The wise are controlled in bodily action, controlled in speech and controlled in thought. They are truly well-controlled.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 18, Malavagga: Impurity - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 18, Phẩm Dơ Bẩn

 (Verses 235-255 - Kệ 235-255)

 

235. Like a withered leaf are you now; death's messengers await you. You stand on the eve of your departure, yet you have made no provision for your journey!

 

236. Make an island for yourself! Strive hard and become wise! Rid of impurities and cleansed of stain, you shall enter the celestial abode of the Noble Ones.

 

237. Your life has come to an end now; You are setting forth into the presence of Yama, the king of death. No resting place is there for you on the way, yet you have made no provision for the journey!

 

238. Make an island unto yourself! Strive hard and become wise! Rid of impurities and cleansed of stain, you shall not come again to birth and decay.

 

239. One by one, little by little, moment by moment, a wise man should remove his own impurities, as a smith removes his dross from silver.

 

240. Just as rust arising from iron eats away the base from which it arises, even so, their own deeds lead transgressors to states of woe.

 

241. Non-repetition is the bane of scriptures; neglect is the bane of a home; slovenliness is the bane of personal appearance, and heedlessness is the bane of a guard.

 

242. Unchastity is the taint in a woman; niggardliness is the taint in a giver. Taints, indeed, are all evil things, both in this world and the next.

 

243. A worse taint than these is ignorance, the worst of all taints. Destroy this one taint and become taintless, O monks!

 

244. Easy is life for the shameless one who is impudent as a crow, is backbiting and forward, arrogant and corrupt.

 

245. Difficult is life for the modest one who always seeks purity, is detached and unassuming, clean in life, and discerning.

 

246-247. One who destroys life, utters lies, takes what is not given, goes to another man's wife, and is addicted to intoxicating drinks — such a man digs up his own root even in this world.

 

248. Know this, O good man: evil things are difficult to control. Let not greed and wickedness drag you to protracted misery.

 

249. People give according to their faith or regard. If one becomes discontented with the food and drink given by others, one does not attain meditative absorption, either by day or by night.

 

250. But he in who this (discontent) is fully destroyed, uprooted and extinct, he attains absorption, both by day and by night.

 

251. There is no fire like lust; there is no grip like hatred; there is no net like delusion; there is no river like craving.

 

252. Easily seen is the fault of others, but one's own fault is difficult to see. Like chaff one winnows another's faults, but hides one's own, even as a crafty fowler hides behind sham branches.

 

253. He who seeks another's faults, who is ever censorious — his cankers grow. He is far from destruction of the cankers.

 

254. There is no track in the sky, and no recluse outside (the Buddha's dispensation). Mankind delights in worldliness, but the Buddhas are free from worldliness. [19]

 

19.

(vv. 254-255) Recluse (samana): here used in the special sense of those who have reached the four supramundane stages.

 

255. There is no track in the sky, and no recluse outside (the Buddha's dispensation). There are no conditioned things that are eternal, and no instability in the Buddhas.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 19, Dhammatthavagga: The Just - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 19, Phẩm Trọng Pháp

 (Verses 256-272 - Kệ 256-272)

 

256. Not by passing arbitrary judgments does a man become just; a wise man is he who investigates both right and wrong.

 

257. He who does not judge others arbitrarily, but passes judgment impartially according to the truth, that sagacious man is a guardian of law and is called just.

 

258. One is not wise because one speaks much. He who is peaceable, friendly and fearless is called wise.

 

259. A man is not versed in Dhamma because he speaks much. He who, after hearing a little Dhamma, realizes its truth directly and is not heedless of it, is truly versed in the Dhamma.

 

260. A monk is not an elder because his head is gray. He is but ripe in age, and he is called one grown old in vain.

 

261. One in whom there is truthfulness, virtue, inoffensiveness, restraint and self-mastery, who is free from defilements and is wise — he is truly called an Elder.

 

262. Not by mere eloquence nor by beauty of form does a man become accomplished, if he is jealous, selfish and deceitful.

 

263. But he in whom these are wholly destroyed, uprooted and extinct, and who has cast out hatred — that wise man is truly accomplished.

 

264. Not by shaven head does a man who is indisciplined and untruthful become a monk. How can he who is full of desire and greed be a monk?

 

265. He who wholly subdues evil both small and great is called a monk, because he has overcome all evil.

 

266. He is not a monk just because he lives on others' alms. Not by adopting outward form does one become a true monk.

 

267. Whoever here (in the Dispensation) lives a holy life, transcending both merit and demerit, and walks with understanding in this world — he is truly called a monk.

 

268. Not by observing silence does one become a sage, if he be foolish and ignorant. But that man is wise who, as if holding a balance-scale accepts only the good.

 

269. The sage (thus) rejecting the evil, is truly a sage. Since he comprehends both (present and future) worlds, he is called a sage.

 

270. He is not noble who injures living beings. He is called noble because he is harmless towards all living beings.

 

271-272. Not by rules and observances, not even by much learning, nor by gain of absorption, nor by a life of seclusion, nor by thinking, "I enjoy the bliss of renunciation, which is not experienced by the worldling" should you, O monks, rest content, until the utter destruction of cankers (Arahantship) is reached.

 

____________________

 

 

The Dhammapada, Chapter 20, Maggavagga: The Path - Kinh Pháp Cú (TM-NTG), Phẩm 20, Phẩm Con Đường

 (Verses 273-289 - Kệ 273-289)

 

273. Of all the paths the Eightfold Path is the best; of all the truths the Four Noble Truths are the best; of all things passionlessness is the best: of men the Seeing One (the Buddha) is the best.

 

274. This is the only path; there is none other for the purification of insight. Tread this path, and you will bewilder Mara.

 

275. Walking upon this path you will make an end of suffering. Having discovered how to pull out the thorn of lust, I make known the path.

 

276. You yourselves must strive; the Buddhas only point the way. Those meditative ones who tread the path are released from the bonds of Mara.

 

277. "All conditioned things are impermanent" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

 

278. "All conditioned things are unsatisfactory" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

 

279. "All things are not-self" — when one sees this with wisdom, one turns away from suffering. This is the path to purification.

 

280. The idler who does not exert himself when he should, who though young and strong is full of sloth, with a mind full of vain thoughts — such an indolent man does not find the path to wisdom.

 

281. Let a man be watchful of speech, well controlled in mind, and not commit evil in bodily action. Let him purify these three courses of action, and win the path made known by the Great Sage.

 

282. Wisdom springs from meditation; without meditation wisdom wanes. Having known these two paths of progress and decline, let a man so conduct himself that his wisdom may increase.

 

283. Cut down the forest (lust), but not the tree; from the forest springs fear. Having cut down the forest and the underbrush (desire), be passionless, O monks! [20]

 

20.

(v. 283) The meaning of this injunction is: "Cut down the forest of lust, but do not mortify the body."

 

284. For so long as the underbrush of desire, even the most subtle, of a man towards a woman is not cut down, his mind is in bondage, like the sucking calf to its mother.

 

285. Cut off your affection in the manner of a man who plucks with his hand an autumn lotus. Cultivate only the path to peace, Nibbana, as made known by the Exalted One.

 

286. "Here shall I live during the rains, here in winter and summer" — thus thinks the fool. He does not realize the danger (that death might intervene).

 

287. As a great flood carries away a sleeping village, so death seizes and carries away the man with a clinging mind, doting on his children and cattle.

 

288. For him who is assailed by death there is no protection by kinsmen. None there are to save him — no sons, nor father, nor relatives.

 

289. Realizing this fact, let the wise man, restrained by morality, hasten to clear the path leading to Nibbana.


____________________




Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
22 Tháng Mười 2020(Xem: 5290)
22 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1640)
19 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1780)
18 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1563)
09 Tháng Bảy 2020(Xem: 1253)
26 Tháng Mười Một 202011:32 CH(Xem: 25)
Tại sao người Ấn lại nói bất kỳ người nào mình gặp cũng đều là người đáng gặp? Có lẽ vì người nào mà mình có duyên gặp đều giúp mình học ra bài học về bản chất con người để mình tùy duyên mà có thái độ ứng xử cho đúng tốt. Nếu vội vàngthái độ chấp nhận hay chối bỏ họ thì con không thể học được điều gì từ những người
25 Tháng Mười Một 202011:39 CH(Xem: 111)
Thưa Thầy! Tôi nay đã 70 tuổi, vừa mới về hưu, vợ thì đã qua đời cách đây hơn chục năm. Tưởng chừng ở tuổi này tôi có thể an dưỡng tuổi già nhưng không Thầy ạ, tôi không biết mình từng tạo nghiệp gì để bây giờ con cháu suốt ngày gây sự với nhau. Cháu đích tôn của tôi hồi đó đặt kỳ vọng bao nhiêu, bây giờ lại ăn chơi lêu lổng,
24 Tháng Mười Một 20209:29 CH(Xem: 128)
Khi mới xuất gia, tôi không có ý định trở thành một dịch giả. Vị thầy đầu tiên của tôi là một tu sĩ người Việt, và tôi ở với thầy tại California trong thập niên 1960. Thầy đã chỉ cho tôi thấy tầm quan trọng trong việc học các loại ngữ văn của kinh điển Phật giáo, bắt đầu là tiếng Pāli, như là một công cụ để thông hiểu Giáo Pháp. Khi tôi đến
23 Tháng Mười Một 202010:04 CH(Xem: 166)
Thầy Xá Lợi Phất - anh cả trong giáo đoàn - có dạy một kinh gọi là Kinh Thủy Dụ mà chúng ta có thể học hôm nay. Kinh này giúp chúng ta quán chiếu để đối trị hữu hiệu cái giận. Kinh Thủy Dụ là một kinh trong bộ Trung A Hàm. Thủy là nước. Khi khát ta cần nước để uống, khi nóng bức ta cần nước để tắm gội. Những lúc khát khô cổ,
22 Tháng Mười Một 202010:24 CH(Xem: 178)
Gần đây tôi có dịp quen biết một người phụ nữ khá lớn tuổi, bà này thường tỏ ra thương hại bạn bè khi thấy họ lúc nào cũng bận tâm lo lắng đến tiền bạc, ngay cả lúc mà cái chết đã gần kề. Bà bảo rằng: "Chưa hề có ai thấy một chiếc két sắt đặt trên một cỗ quan tài bao giờ cả !". Như vậy thì chúng ta sẽ nên lưu lại cho con cháu mình
21 Tháng Mười Một 20206:28 CH(Xem: 198)
Mười bốn câu trích dẫn lời của Đức Phật dưới đây được chọn trong số 34 câu đã được đăng tải trên trang mạng của báo Le Monde, một tổ hợp báo chí uy tínlâu đời của nước Pháp. Một số câu được trích nguyên văn từ các bài kinh, trong trường hợp này nguồn gốc của các câu trích dẫn đó sẽ được ghi chú rõ ràng, trái lại các câu
20 Tháng Mười Một 20201:53 CH(Xem: 200)
Điều trước nhất, ta nên thấy được sự khác biệt giữa một cái đau nơi thân với phản ứng của tâm đối với cái đau ấy. Mặc dù thân và tâm có mối liên hệ rất mật thiết với nhau, nhưng tâm ta không nhất thiết phải chịu cùng chung một số phận với thân. Khi thân có một cơn đau, tâm ta có thể lùi ra xa một chút. Thay vì bị lôi kéo vào, tâm ta có thể
19 Tháng Mười Một 20206:34 CH(Xem: 268)
Khi tôi viết về đề tài sống với cái đau, tôi không cần phải dùng đến trí tưởng tượng. Từ năm 1976, tôi bị khổ sở với một chứng bệnh nhức đầu kinh niên và nó tăng dần thêm theo năm tháng. Tình trạng này cũng giống như có ai đó khiêng một tảng đá hoa cương thật to chặn ngay trên con đường tu tập của tôi. Cơn đau ấy thường xóa trắng
18 Tháng Mười Một 20206:45 CH(Xem: 221)
Bài viết dưới đây, nguyên gốc là tài liệu hướng dẫn thực hành Phật Pháp, được phổ biến nội bộ trong một nhóm học Phật. Nhóm này có khoảng 10 thành viên nồng cốt, thường cùng nhau tu tập vào mỗi chiều tối thứ Sáu tại gia, về sau được đổi qua mỗi sáng thứ Bảy do đa phần anh chị em trong nhóm đã nghỉ hưu. Qua cơn bão dịch
14 Tháng Mười Một 20202:41 CH(Xem: 252)
Từ khổ đau đến chấm dứt khổ đau cách nhau bao xa? Khoảng cách ấy ta có thể vượt qua chỉ trong một chớp mắt. Đó là lời Phật dạy trong kinh Tu Tập Căn (Indriyabhavana Sutta), bài kinh cuối của Trung Bộ Kinh, số 152. Trong một trao đổi với một người đệ tử của Bà la môn tên Uttara, đức Phật mở đầu bằng sự diễn tả một kinh nghiệm
13 Tháng Mười Một 20208:24 CH(Xem: 263)
- Trong các kinh điển có nhiều định nghĩa khác nhau nhưng chữ Niết Bàn (Nirvana) không ngoài những nghĩa Viên tịch (hoàn toàn vắng lặng), Vô sanh (không còn sanh diệt) và Giải thoát v.v... những nghĩa này nhằm chỉ cho người đạt đạo sống trong trạng thái tâm thể hoàn toàn vắng lặng, dứt hết vọng tưởng vô minh.
12 Tháng Mười Một 20207:33 CH(Xem: 255)
Tại sao người hiền lành lại gặp phải tai ương? Câu hỏi này đặc biệt thích hợp khi áp dụng vào bối cảnh đại dịch Covid-19 đang diễn ra. Bệnh Covid-19 không chừa một ai, từ người giầu có đến người nghèo, từ người quyền quý đến người bình dân, từ người khỏe mạnh đến người yếu đuối. Tuy nhiên, ngay cả trong đời sống hàng ngày,
11 Tháng Mười Một 202011:43 CH(Xem: 252)
Có một anh thương gia cưới một người vợ xinh đẹp. Họ sống với nhau và sinh ra một bé trai kháu khỉnh. Nhưng người vợ lại ngã bịnh và mất sau đó, người chồng bất hạnh dồn tất cả tình thương vào đứa con. Đứa bé trở thành nguồn vui và hạnh phúc duy nhất của anh. Một hôm, vì việc buôn bán anh phải rời khỏi nhà, có một bọn cướp
10 Tháng Mười Một 20208:33 CH(Xem: 537)
Sáng nay, Thánh Đức Đạt Lai Lạt Ma đã viết thư cho Joe Biden để chúc mừng Ông được bầu làm Tổng thống tiếp theo của Hợp chủng quốc Hoa Kỳ. Ngài viết: “Như có lẽ bạn đã biết, từ lâu tôi đã ngưỡng mộ Hoa Kỳ như một nền tảng của sự tự do, dân chủ, tự do tôn giáo và pháp quyền. Nhân loại đã đặt niềm hy vọng lớn lao vào tầm nhìn
09 Tháng Mười Một 20208:19 CH(Xem: 285)
Có một chuyện kể trong Phật giáo như sau, có một vị tăng nhân cứu được mạng sống của một người thanh niên tự sát. Người thanh niên sau khi tỉnh dậy, nói với vị tăng nhân: “Cảm ơn đại sư, nhưng xin ngài đừng phí sức cứu tôi bởi vì tôi đã quyết định không sống nữa rồi. Hôm nay cho dù không chết thì ngày mai tôi cũng vẫn chết”.
08 Tháng Mười Một 20207:59 CH(Xem: 346)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, tác giả quyển sách này là một nữ cư sĩ Thái lan. Chữ upasika trong tiếng Pa-li và tiếng Phạn có nghĩa là một cư sĩ phụ nữ. Thật thế, bà là một người tự tu tậpsuốt đời chỉ tự nhận mình là một người tu hành thế tục, thế nhưng giới tu hành
06 Tháng Mười Một 202011:19 CH(Xem: 374)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, còn được biết đến qua bút danh, K. Khao-suan-luang, là một vị nữ Pháp sư nổi tiếng nhất trong thế kỷ 20 ở Thái Lan. Sinh năm 1901, trong một gia đình thương nhân Trung Hoa ở Rajburi (một thành phố ở phía Tây Bangkok), bà là con cả
05 Tháng Mười Một 20208:12 CH(Xem: 296)
Tất cả chúng ta đều nghĩ đến và chăm lo sức khỏe của mình, chỉ ít hay nhiều tùy theo mình còn trẻ hay già yếu và ốm đau. Thế nhưng sức khỏe không phải chỉ thuộc lãnh vực thân xác mà còn liên quan đến lãnh vực tâm thần. Như vậy thì tín ngưỡng nói chung và Phật giáo nói riêng có giữ một vị trí hay vai trò nào đối với mối quan tâm
04 Tháng Mười Một 20206:03 CH(Xem: 404)
Cách đây vài năm đã xảy ra mấy cuộc biểu tình trên đường phố sau khi một viên quản ngục nhà tù Guantanamo Bay bị buộc tội là đã vứt quyển kinh vào bồn cầu và giật nước cho nó trôi đi. Ngày hôm sau, một ký giả tờ báo địa phương gọi điện thoại cho tôi, nói rằng anh ta đang viết một bài về sự việc vừa xảy ra, muốn hỏi các nhà
03 Tháng Mười Một 202011:39 SA(Xem: 297)
Thuở nhỏ lúc còn cắp sách đến trường tôi hay mỉm cười và mỗi lần như thế thì lại bị mắng và quở phạt. Trong khi đang chép phạt thì lại bị thêm một lần phạt nữa. Lúc nào tôi cũng mỉm cười. Người ta mắng tôi: "Im đi, không được nhạo báng kẻ khác nhé!". Bắt đầu từ đấy tôi mới hiểu được là tại sao lại không được phép cười.
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 2177)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 3864)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 5476)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
19 Tháng Mười Một 20206:34 CH(Xem: 268)
Khi tôi viết về đề tài sống với cái đau, tôi không cần phải dùng đến trí tưởng tượng. Từ năm 1976, tôi bị khổ sở với một chứng bệnh nhức đầu kinh niên và nó tăng dần thêm theo năm tháng. Tình trạng này cũng giống như có ai đó khiêng một tảng đá hoa cương thật to chặn ngay trên con đường tu tập của tôi. Cơn đau ấy thường xóa trắng
08 Tháng Mười Một 20207:59 CH(Xem: 346)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, tác giả quyển sách này là một nữ cư sĩ Thái lan. Chữ upasika trong tiếng Pa-li và tiếng Phạn có nghĩa là một cư sĩ phụ nữ. Thật thế, bà là một người tự tu tậpsuốt đời chỉ tự nhận mình là một người tu hành thế tục, thế nhưng giới tu hành
06 Tháng Mười Một 202011:19 CH(Xem: 374)
Upasika Kee Nanayon, còn được biết đến qua bút danh, K. Khao-suan-luang, là một vị nữ Pháp sư nổi tiếng nhất trong thế kỷ 20 ở Thái Lan. Sinh năm 1901, trong một gia đình thương nhân Trung Hoa ở Rajburi (một thành phố ở phía Tây Bangkok), bà là con cả
23 Tháng Mười Một 202010:04 CH(Xem: 166)
Thầy Xá Lợi Phất - anh cả trong giáo đoàn - có dạy một kinh gọi là Kinh Thủy Dụ mà chúng ta có thể học hôm nay. Kinh này giúp chúng ta quán chiếu để đối trị hữu hiệu cái giận. Kinh Thủy Dụ là một kinh trong bộ Trung A Hàm. Thủy là nước. Khi khát ta cần nước để uống, khi nóng bức ta cần nước để tắm gội. Những lúc khát khô cổ,
22 Tháng Mười 20201:00 CH(Xem: 5290)
Tuy nhiên đối với thiền sinh hay ít ra những ai đang hướng về chân trời rực rỡ ánh hồng giải thoát, có thể nói Kinh Đại Niệm Xứbài kinh thỏa thích nhất hay đúng hơn là bài kinh tối cần, gần gũi nhất. Tối cần như cốt tủy và gần gũi như máu chảy khắp châu thân. Những lời kinh như những lời thiên thu gọi hãy dũng mãnh lên đường
21 Tháng Mười 202010:42 CH(Xem: 433)
Một lần Đấng Thế Tôn ngụ tại tu viện của Cấp Cô Độc (Anathapindita) nơi khu vườn Kỳ Đà Lâm (Jeta) gần thị trấn Xá Vệ (Savatthi). Vào lúc đó có một vị Bà-la-môn to béo và giàu sang đang chuẩn bị để chủ tế một lễ hiến sinh thật to. Số súc vật sắp bị giết gồm năm trăm con bò mộng, năm trăm con bê đực, năm trăm con bò cái tơ,
20 Tháng Mười 20209:07 CH(Xem: 438)
Tôi sinh ra trong một gia đình thấp hèn, Cực khổ, dăm bữa đói một bữa no. Sinh sống với một nghề hèn mọn: Quét dọn và nhặt hoa héo rơi xuống từ các bệ thờ (của những người Bà-la-môn). Chẳng ai màng đến tôi, mọi người khinh miệt và hay rầy mắng tôi, Hễ gặp ai thì tôi cũng phải cúi đầu vái lạy. Thế rồi một hôm, tôi được diện kiến
14 Tháng Mười 202010:00 SA(Xem: 2940)
Một thời Đức Phật ở chùa Kỳ Viên thuộc thành Xá Vệ do Cấp Cô Độc phát tâm hiến cúng. Bấy giờ, Bāhiya là một người theo giáo phái Áo Vải, sống ở vùng đất Suppāraka ở cạnh bờ biển. Ông là một người được thờ phụng, kính ngưỡng, ngợi ca, tôn vinh và kính lễ. Ông là một người lỗi lạc, được nhiều người thần phục.
11 Tháng Năm 20208:38 CH(Xem: 1959)
một lần Đấng Thế Tôn lưu trú tại bộ tộc của người Koliyan, gần một ngôi làng mang tên là Haliddavasana, và sáng hôm đó, có một nhóm đông các tỳ-kheo thức sớm. Họ ăn mặc áo lót bên trong thật chỉnh tề, khoác thêm áo ấm bên ngoài, ôm bình bát định đi vào làng