A Still Forest Pool (Mặt Hồ Tĩnh Lặng)

31 Tháng Bảy 201711:18 SA(Xem: 2914)
A Still Forest Pool (Mặt Hồ Tĩnh Lặng)
 
 Intro_1A

 
A Still Forest Pool (Mặt Hồ Tĩnh Lặng)
Ajahn Chah
Source-Nguồn: dhammatalks.net
 
____________________

 

 

CONTENT

 

 

PART 1

 

Understanding the Buddha’s Teachings

    The Simple Path

    The Middle Way 

    Ending Doubt

    Go Beyond Words : See for Yourself

    Buddhist Psychology

    Study and Experiencing

    The Chicken or the Egg

    Thieves in Your Heart

 

PART 2

 

Correcting Our Views

    The Wrong Road 

    Right Understanding

    Starving Defilements

    Happiness and Suffering

    The Discriminating Mind

    Sense Objects and the Mind

    Problems of the World

    Just That Much

    Follow Your Teacher

    Trust Your Heart

    Why Do You Practice?

    Let the Tree Grow

    Too Much of a Good Thing

 

PART 3

 

Our Life Is Our Practice

    Meditation in Action

   To Grasp a Snake

    Virtue

    The Spiral of Virtue Concentration and Wisdom

    What is Natural?

    Moderation

    Rely on Yourself

    Don’t Imitate

    Know Yourself – Know Others

    Let Others Be

    Real Love

    Learning Through Life

    Oppose Your Mind

    Just Let Go

 

PART 4

 

Meditation and Formal Practice

    Mindfulness

    The Essence of Vipassana: Observing Your Mind

    Walking Meditation

    Who is Sick?

    Learning Concentration

    Stick to It

    Seven Days to Enlightenment

    Learning to Chant

    Forget About Time

    Some Hints in Practicing

    Contemplate Everything

    The Leaves will Always Fall

 

PART 5

 

Lessons in the Forest 

    A Monk’s Life

    Restraint

    Rules Are Tools

    Go Left, Go Right

    Cures for Restlessness

    The “Deeper Meaning” of a Chant

    The Dharma of Menial Tasks

    Harmony with Others

    Monk’s Don’t Chatter

    Opposing Lust

    Scenes Change, but the Mind Remains the Same

    Where Can You Run to?

    Looking for the Buddha

    Rely on Oneself

    Keep the Teaching Simple

    Learning to Teach

    What is The Best Kind of Meditation?

    A Wonderful Meal

    Achaan Chah’s Cottage

    Holy Ceremonies and Hot Days

    The Real Magic

    Practice of the Householder

 

PART 6

 

Questions for the Teacher

    Questions and Answers

 

 

PART 7

 

Realization

    Not-Self

    Short and Straight

    Underground Water

    The Joy of the Buddha

    Picking Up Mangoes

    The Timeless Buddha

    Yes, I Speak Zen

    The Unstuck Gong

    Nothing Special

    Inside You is Nothing, Nothing at All

    In Ending

 

____________________

 

INTRODUCTION

 

Suppose you were to go to Asia in the 1980s in search of living teachings of the Buddha, to discover if there are still monks and nuns practicing a life of simplicity and meditation, supported by alms-food, and dwelling in the forest. Perhaps you had read descriptions of the Buddha himself wondering with his monks in the forests of India, inviting men and women of good families to join him in cultivating wisdom and universal compassion, inviting them to live the simple life of a mendicant, to dedicate themselves to inner calm and awareness. Would you find this way of life alive today, twenty-five centuries later? And would its teachings still be applicable and relevant for-our modem society, our modem minds?

 

You would land at a modem airport near Bangkok or Colombo or Rangoon. In your taxi you would drive through Asian city streets, passing cars, crowded busses, sidewalk vendors of tropical fruits. Every few blocks you would see the golden pagoda or spire of an urban Buddhist temple. But these are not the temples you have come to search for. They contain monks and nuns who study the ancient texts, who can chant and preach, and from this they teach. But to find the simple life of dwelling in the forest, the meditative living with robe and bowl, as old as the Buddha himself, you would have to leave the cities and their temples far behind. If it were Thailand, the country with the greatest number of monasteries and monks, you would board the train at busy Hualampong station, leaving early in the morning for the provinces of the far south or northeast.

 

The first hour's journey would take you clear of the urban sprawl, beyond the houses, businesses, and shanties backed up along the railway track. Vast plains of central Thailand would roll by, the green rice bowl of Southeast Asia. Mile after mile of paddy fields, checkerboarded into lots by small dikes between fields and rhythmically divided by canals and waterways. On the horizon of this sea of rice, every few miles in four or five directions you would see islands-dense clusters of palm and banana trees. If your train rolled close enough to one of these palm islands, you would see the glint of an orange-roofed monastery and cluster of wooden houses on stilts that make up a Southeast Asian village.

 

Every settled village, whether with five hundred or two thousand residents, has at least one monastery. It serves as the place for prayer, for ceremony, as the meeting hall, and for many years also served as the village school. Here is the place where most young men of the village will ordain at age twenty, for one year or three months, to learn enough of the ways of the Buddha to "ripen" into mature members of their society. The monastery is probably run by a few older, simple, and well-meaning monks who have studied some of the classic texts and know enough of ceremonies and of the basic teachings to serve as village priests. This monastery is an integral and beautiful part of village life, but it is not the temple you have come to search for.

 

Your train heads north toward the ancient capitol of Auddhaya, filled with the ruins of magnificent temples and 'broken palaces that were sacked centuries ago in the periodic wars with neighboring kingdoms. The spirit of these magnificent ruins remains in the enormous stone Buddhas, imperturbably weathering the centuries.

 

Now your train turns east for the long journey toward the Lao border, across the reaches of the Korat Plateau. Hour after hour the land passes. Still you see rice paddies and villages, but they gradually become sparser and poorer. The canals and lush gardens of Central Thai villages, mango trees, and tropical greenery turn into a simpler landscape. Houses are smaller. Village monasteries still gleam, but they too are smaller and simpler. Here an older, more self-sufficient way of life is preserved. You can see women weaving hand loomed blankets on their porches, while rice farmers work and children tend the water buffalo in wet gullies alongside the railroad tracks.

 

The rural countryside in these lesser developed provinces holds much of what remains of the tradition of forest monks and nuns. It still has regions of forest and jungle, small thickly covered mountains, and unsettled borderlands. And for many centuries it has supported forest monks and monasteries dedicated to the preservation and realization of the enlightenment of the Buddha. For the most part these monks do not function as village priests, nor do they teach school, nor study and preserve the language of the ancient written scriptures. Their intent is to live fully and realize in their own hearts and minds the insight and inner peace taught by the Buddha.

 

If you left the train and made your way by bus or hired car down some dirt road to such a monastery, one of dozens in northeast Thailand, what would you find? Would the teachings and way of practice be relevant in the 1980s? Would the insight and awareness training address the needs of one coming from a modern and complex society?

 

You would discover that many Westerners had come before you. Since 1965 hundreds of Europeans and Americans like you have come to visit and learn in the forest. Some came to study for short periods and then returned home to integrate what they learned into their household life. Some came to train more thoroughly as monks for one, two, or more years and then return home. Another group found life in the forest to be a rich and compelling way to live, and these remain in monasteries to this day.

 

For each of these groups the teachings have spoken directly to their hearts and minds, offering them a wise and conscious way to live. At first the way may seem almost easy, deceptively simple. But upon attempting to put the Buddha's way into practice, one discovers that it is not so easy. Yet, despite the effort it takes, these people feel that nothing could be more valuable than to discover the Dharma* or truth in one's own life.

 

From the moment of your entry into a forest monastery like Wat Ba Pong, the spirit of practice is evident. There is the stillness of trees rustling and the quiet movement of monks doing chores or mindful walking meditation. The whole monastery is spread over a hundred acres, divided into two sections form monks and nuns. The simple unadorned cottages are individually nestled in small forest clearings so that there are trees and silent paths between them. In the central area of the Wat are the main teaching hall, dining area, and chapel for ordination. The whole forest setting supports the atmosphere of simplicity and renunciation. You feel that you have finally arrived.

 

The monks who live in those monasteries have chosen to follow this uncomplicated and disciplined way of practice called dhudanga. The tradition of forest monks who voluntarily choose to follow a more austere way of life dates back to the Buddha, who allowed a supplementary code of thirteen special precepts, limiting the robes, food, and dwellings of monks. At the heart of this life style are few possessions, much meditation, and a once-daily round of alms-food begging. This way of life spread with the rest of Buddhism into the thick forests of Burma, Thailand, and Laos, places filled with caves and wild terrain, ideal for such intensive practice. These ascetic monks have traditionally been wanderers, living singly or in small groups, moving from one rural area to another, and using handmade cloth umbrella tents hung from trees as their temporary abode. Practical Dharma teachings from one of the greatest forest monasteries, Wat Ba Pong, and its master Achaan Chah have been translated and compiled and are offered to the West in this book.

 

Achaan Chah and his teachers, Achaan Tong Rath and Achaan Mum, themselves spent many years walking and meditating in these forests to develop their practice. From them and other forest teachers has come a legacy of immediate and powerful Dharma teachings, directed not toward ritual Buddhism or scholastic learning, but toward those who wish to purify their hearts and vision by actually living the teachings of the Buddha.

 

As great masters emerged in this forest tradition, laypersons and monks sought them out for teaching advice. Often, to make themselves available, these teachers would stop wandering and settle in a particular forest area where a dhudanga monastery would grow up around them. As population pressures have increased in this century, fewer forest areas are left for wanderers, and these forest monastery preserves of past and current masters are becoming the dwelling place of most ascetic and practice-oriented monks.

 

Wat Ba Pong monastery developed when Achaan Chah, after years of travel and meditation study, returned to settle in a thick forest grove near the village of his birth. The grove, uninhabited by humans, was known as a place of cobras, tigers, and ghosts-the perfect location for a forest monk, according to Achaan Chah. Around him a large monastery grew up.

 

From its beginnings as a few thatched huts in the forest, Wat Ba Pong has developed into one of the largest and best-run monasteries in Thailand. As Achaan Chah's skill and fame as a teacher have become widespread, the number of visitors and devotees has rapidly increased. In response to requests from devotees throughout Thailand, over fifty branch monasteries under the guidance of abbots trained by Achaan Chah have also been opened, including one near Wat Ba Pong especially designed for the many Western students who have come to seek Achaan Chah's guidance in the teachings. In recent years several branch monasteries and associated centers have been opened in Western countries as well, most notably the large forest Wat at Chithurst, England, run by Abbot Sumedho, Achaan Chah's Senior Western disciple.

 

Achaan Chah's teachings contain what has been called "the heart of Buddhist meditation," the direct and simple practices of calming the heart and opening the mind to true insight. This way of mindfulness or insight meditation has become a rapidly growing form of Buddhist practice in the West. Taught by monks and laypeople who have themselves studied in forest monasteries or intensive retreat centers, it provides a universal and direct way of training our bodies, our hearts, and our minds. It can teach us how to deal with greed and fear and sorrow and how to learn a path of patience, wisdom, and selfless compassion. This book is meant to provide guidance and counsel for those who wish to practice.

 

Achaan Chah's own practice started early in life and developed through years of wandering and austerity under the guidance of several great forest masters. He laughingly recalls how, even as a child, he wanted to play monk when the other children played house and would come to them with a make believe begging bowl asking for candy and sweets. But his own practice was difficult, he relates, and the qualities of patience and endurance he developed are central to the teachings he gives his own disciples. A great inspiration for Achaan Chah as a young monk came from sitting at his father's sickbed during the last days and weeks of his father's life, directly facing the fact of decay and death. 'When we don't understand death," Achaan Chah teaches, "life can be very confusing." Because of this experience, Achaan Chah was strongly motivated in his practice to discover the causes of our worldly suffering and the source of peace and freedom taught by the Buddha. By his own account, he held nothing back, giving up everything

 

for the Dharma, the truth. He encountered much hardship and suffering, including doubts of all kinds as well as physical illness and pain. Yet he stayed in the forest and sat-sat and watched-and, even though there were days when he could do nothing but cry, he brought what he calls a quality of daring to his practice. Out of this daring eventually grew wisdom, a joyful spirit, and an uncanny ability to help others.

 

Given spontaneously in the Thai and Lao languages, the teachings in this book reflect this joyful spirit of practice. Their flavor is clearly monastic, oriented to the community of men who have renounced the household life to join Achaan Chah in the forest. Hence frequent reference is made to he rather than he or she, and the emphasis is on the monks (an active community of forest nuns also exists) rather than laypersons. Yet the quality of the Dharma expressed here is immediate and universal, appropriate to each of us. Achaan Chah addresses the basic human problems of greed, fear, hatred, and delusion, insisting that we become aware of these states and of the real suffering that they cause in our lives and in our world. This teaching, the Four Noble Truths, is the first given by the Buddha and describes suffering, its cause, and the path to its end.

 

See how attachment causes suffering, Achaan Chah declares over and over. Study it in your experience. See the ever-changing nature of sight, sound, perception, feeling, and thought. Understanding the impermanent, insecure, selfless nature of life is Achaan Chah's message to us, for only when we see and accept all three characteristics can we live in peace. The forest tradition works directly with our understanding of and our resistance to these truths, with our fears - and anger and desires. Achaan Chah tells us to confront our defilements and to use the tools of renunciation, perseverance, and awareness to overcome them. He urges us to learn not to be lost in our moods and anxieties but to train ourselves instead to see clearly and directly the true nature of mind and the world.

 

Inspiration comes from Achaan Chah's clarity and joy and the directness of his ways of practice in the forest. To be around him awakens in one the spirit of inquiry, humor, wonderment, understanding, and a deep sense of inner peace. If these pages capture a bit of that spirit in their instructions and tales of the forest life and inspire you to further practice, then their purpose is well served.

 

So listen to Achaan Chah carefully and take him to heart, for he teaches practice, not theory, and human happiness and freedom are his concerns. In the early years when WatBa Pong was starting to attract many visitors, a series of signs was posted along the entry path. "You there, coming to visit," the first one said, "be quite We're trying to meditate." Another stated simply, "To practice Dharma and realize truth is the only thing of value in this life. Isn't it time to begin?" In this spirit, Achaan Chah speaks to us directly, inviting us to quiet our hearts and investigate the truth of life. Isn't it time that we begin?

 

___________________


Xem thêm - See more articles
A Still Forest Pool (Mặt Hồ Tĩnh Lặng)
Mặt Hồ Tĩnh Lặng (A Still Forest Pool)


___________________


Gửi ý kiến của bạn
Tắt
Telex
VNI
Tên của bạn
Email của bạn
01 Tháng Bảy 2019(Xem: 960)
30 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 882)
29 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 882)
28 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 945)
27 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 905)
26 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 1026)
25 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 1005)
24 Tháng Sáu 2019(Xem: 1096)
31 Tháng Năm 2019(Xem: 1208)
29 Tháng Năm 2019(Xem: 1351)
26 Tháng Năm 2019(Xem: 3137)
25 Tháng Năm 2019(Xem: 3116)
24 Tháng Năm 2019(Xem: 3609)
18 Tháng Tư 2019(Xem: 3438)
18 Tháng Tư 2019(Xem: 3478)
24 Tháng Chín 2018(Xem: 5392)
01 Tháng Mười Một 2017(Xem: 2547)
31 Tháng Mười 2017(Xem: 2209)
28 Tháng Mười 2017(Xem: 2667)
25 Tháng Chín 2017(Xem: 3242)
30 Tháng Ba 20209:02 CH(Xem: 160)
With so many books available on Buddhism, one may ask if there is need for yet another text. Although books on Buddhism are available on the market, many of them are written for those who have already acquired a basic understanding of the Buddha Dhamma.
29 Tháng Ba 20209:50 SA(Xem: 180)
Với số sách Phật quá nhiều hiện nay, câu hỏi đặt ra là có cần thêm một cuốn nữa hay không. Mặc dù có rất nhiều sách Phật Giáo, nhưng đa số đều được viết nhằm cho những người đã có căn bản Phật Pháp. Một số được viết theo văn chương lối cổ, dịch nghĩa
28 Tháng Ba 202010:51 SA(Xem: 158)
Quan niệm khổ của mỗi người tùy thuộc vào hoàn cảnh trong cuộc sống hiện tạitrình độ nhận thức của mỗi người. Cho nên con đường giải thoát khổ của mỗi người cũng phải thích ứng theo nguyện vọng của mỗi người. Con đường giải thoát khổ này hướng dẫn
27 Tháng Ba 20203:30 CH(Xem: 123)
TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC 4 CÕI - Trong 4 loại ấy, gọi là 4 cõi. Tức là cõi khổ, cõi vui, Dục-giới, Sắc-giới, cõi Vô-sắc-giới. NÓI VỀ 4 CÕI KHỔ - Trong nhóm 4 cõi ấy, cõi khổ cũng có 4 là: địa ngục, Bàng sanh, Ngạ quỉ và Atula. NÓI VỀ 7 CÕI VUI DỤC GIỚI -
26 Tháng Ba 20207:16 CH(Xem: 178)
Ni sư Kee Nanayon (1901-1979) là một trong những vị nữ thiền sư nổi tiếng ở Thái Lan. Năm 1945, bà thành lập thiền viện Khao-suan-luang dành cho các nữ Phật tử tu thiền trong vùng đồi núi tỉnh Rajburi, miền tây Thái Lan. Ngoài các bài pháp được truyền đi
24 Tháng Ba 20202:32 CH(Xem: 189)
Sự giải thoát tinh thần, theo lời dạy của Đức Phật, được thành tựu bằng việc đoạn trừ các lậu hoặc (ô nhiễm trong tâm). Thực vậy, bậc A-la-hán thường được nói đến như bậc lậu tận - Khināsava, bậc đã đoạn trừ mọi lậu hoặc. Chính vì thế, người đi tìm chân lý cần phải hiểu rõ những lậu hoặc này là gì, và làm cách nào để loại trừ được nó.
23 Tháng Ba 20203:56 CH(Xem: 219)
Rất nhiều sách trình bày nhầm lẫn giữa Định và Tuệ hay Chỉ và Quán, đưa đến tình trạng định không ra định, tuệ chẳng ra tuệ, hoặc hành thiền định hóa ra chỉ là những “ngoại thuật” (những hình thức tập trung tư tưởng hay ý chímục đích khác với định nhà Phật), và hành thiền tuệ lại có kết quả của định rồi tưởng lầm là đã chứng được
22 Tháng Ba 20209:08 CH(Xem: 177)
Everyone is aware of the benefits of physical training. However, we are not merely bodies, we also possess a mind which needs training. Mind training or meditation is the key to self-mastery and to that contentment which brings happiness. Of all forces the force of the mind is the most potent. It is a power by itself. To understand the real nature
21 Tháng Ba 20209:58 CH(Xem: 214)
Chúng ta lấy làm phấn khởi mà nhận thấy rằng hiện nay càng ngày người ta càng thích thú quan tâm đến pháp hành thiền, nhất là trong giới người Tây phương, và pháp môn nầy đang phát triễn mạnh mẽ. Trong những năm gần đây, các nhà tâm lý học khuyên
20 Tháng Ba 20208:30 CH(Xem: 190)
Bốn Sự Thật Cao Quý được các kinh sách Hán ngữ gọi là Tứ Diệu Đế, là căn bản của toàn bộ Giáo Huấn của Đức Phật và cũng là một đề tài thuyết giảng quen thuộc. Do đó đôi khi chúng ta cũng có cảm tưởng là mình hiểu rõ khái niệm này, thế nhưng thật ra thì ý nghĩa của Bốn Sự Thật Cao Quý rất sâu sắc và thuộc nhiều cấp bậc
17 Tháng Ba 20205:51 CH(Xem: 313)
Mindfulness with Breathing is a meditation technique anchored In our breathing, it is an exquisite tool for exploring life through subtle awareness and active investigation of the breathing and life. The breath is life, to stop breathing is to die. The breath is vital, natural, soothing, revealing. It is our constant companion. Wherever we go,
16 Tháng Ba 20204:16 CH(Xem: 304)
Giác niệm về hơi thở là một kỹ thuật quán tưởng cắm sâu vào hơi thở của chúng ta. Đó là một phương tiện tinh vi để thám hiểm đời sống xuyên qua ý thức tế nhị và sự điều nghiên tích cực về hơi thởđời sống. Hơi thở chính là đời sống; ngừng thở là chết. Hơi thở thiết yếu cho đời sống, làm cho êm dịu, tự nhiên, và năng phát hiện.
15 Tháng Ba 202012:00 CH(Xem: 251)
Phật giáođạo Phật là những giáo lý và sự tu tập để dẫn tới mục tiêu rốt ráo của nó là giác ngộgiải thoát khỏi vòng luân hồi sinh tử. Tuy nhiên, (a) mọi người thế tục đều đang sống trong các cộng đồng dân cư, trong các tập thể, đoàn thể, và trong xã hội; và (b) những người xuất gia dù đã bỏ tục đi tu nhưng họ vẫn đang sống tu
13 Tháng Ba 20209:16 CH(Xem: 227)
Người ta thường để ý đến nhiều tính cách khác nhau trong những người hành thiền. Một số người xem thiền như là một thứ có tính thực nghiệm, phê phán, chiêm nghiệm; những người khác lại tin tưởng hơn, tận tâm hơn, và xem nó như là lí tưởng. Một số có vẻ thích nghi tốt và hài lòng với chính mình và những gì xung quanh,
12 Tháng Ba 20209:36 SA(Xem: 347)
Kinh Đại Niệm Xứ - Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna được xem là bài kinh quan trọng nhất trên phương diện thực hành thiền Phật giáo. Các thiền phái Minh Sát, dù khác nhau về đối tượng quán niệm, vẫn không xa khỏi bốn lĩnh vực: Thân, Thọ, Tâm, và Pháp mà Đức Phật
10 Tháng Ba 20202:09 CH(Xem: 318)
Giới học thiền ở nước ta mấy thập niên gần đây đã bắt đầu làm quen với thiền Vipassanā. Số lượng sách báo về chuyên đề này được dịch và viết tuy chưa nhiều lắm nhưng chúng ta đã thấy tính chất phong phú đa dạng của Thiền Minh Sát hay còn gọi là Thiền Tuệ hoặc Thiền Quán này. Thiền Vipassanā luôn có một nguyên tắc nhất quán
10 Tháng Ba 202010:20 SA(Xem: 304)
Trong tất cả các thiền sư cận đại, bà Achaan Naeb là một thiền sư đặc biệt hơn cả. Bà là một nữ cư sĩ đã từng dạy thiền, dạy đạo cho các bậc cao tăng, trong đó có cả ngài Hộ Tông, Tăng thống Giáo hội Tăng già Nguyên thủy Việt Nam cũng đã từng theo học thiền với bà một thời gian. Năm 44 tuổi, Bà đã bắt đầu dạy thiền
08 Tháng Ba 202011:08 SA(Xem: 258)
A.B.: Đầu tiên, khi họ hỏi Sư: “Sư có muốn nhận giải thưởng này không?” và Sư đã đồng ý. Nhưng phản ứng đầu tiên ngay sau đó là: “Tại sao Sư lại muốn nhận giải thưởng này? Sư là một nhà Sư Phật Giáo, đây là việc một nhà Sư (cần phải) làm. Là một nhà Sư, chúng ta đi truyền giáo, đi phục vụ, và chúng ta không nhất thiết phải đòi hỏi
07 Tháng Ba 20205:16 CH(Xem: 330)
Biên tập từ các bài pháp thoại của ngài Thiền sư Ajahn Brahmavamso trong khóa thiền tích cực 9 ngày, vào tháng 12-1997, tại North Perth, Tây Úc. Nguyên tác Anh ngữ được ấn tống lần đầu tiên năm 1998, đến năm 2003 đã được tái bản 7 lần, tổng cộng 60 ngàn quyển. Ngoài ra, tập sách này cũng đã được dịch sang tiếng Sinhala
06 Tháng Ba 20209:21 SA(Xem: 333)
Trước khi nói về phương pháplợi ích của thiền Minh Sát Tuệ, chúng ta cần điểm qua một số vấn đề liên quan đến "pháp môn thiền định" Phật giáo. Gần đây, dường như pháp môn thiền của Phật giáo bị lãng quên và không còn đóng vai trò quan trọng
02 Tháng Mười Hai 201910:13 CH(Xem: 696)
Nhật Bản là một trong những quốc gia có tỉ lệ tội phạm liên quan đến súng thấp nhất thế giới. Năm 2014, số người thiệt mạng vì súng ở Nhật chỉ là sáu người, con số đó ở Mỹ là 33,599. Đâu là bí mật? Nếu bạn muốn mua súng ở Nhật, bạn cần kiên nhẫnquyết tâm. Bạn phải tham gia khóa học cả ngày về súng, làm bài kiểm tra viết
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:30 CH(Xem: 2287)
Khóa Tu "Chuyển Nghiệp Khai Tâm", Mùa Hè 2019 - Ngày 12, 13, Và 14/07/2019 (Mỗi ngày từ 9:00 AM đến 7:00 PM) - Tại: Andrew Hill High School - 3200 Senter Road, San Jose, CA 95111
12 Tháng Bảy 20199:00 CH(Xem: 3682)
Các Khóa Tu Học Mỗi Năm (Thường Niên) Ở San Jose, California Của Thiền Viện Đại Đăng
30 Tháng Ba 20209:02 CH(Xem: 160)
With so many books available on Buddhism, one may ask if there is need for yet another text. Although books on Buddhism are available on the market, many of them are written for those who have already acquired a basic understanding of the Buddha Dhamma.
29 Tháng Ba 20209:50 SA(Xem: 180)
Với số sách Phật quá nhiều hiện nay, câu hỏi đặt ra là có cần thêm một cuốn nữa hay không. Mặc dù có rất nhiều sách Phật Giáo, nhưng đa số đều được viết nhằm cho những người đã có căn bản Phật Pháp. Một số được viết theo văn chương lối cổ, dịch nghĩa
28 Tháng Ba 202010:51 SA(Xem: 158)
Quan niệm khổ của mỗi người tùy thuộc vào hoàn cảnh trong cuộc sống hiện tạitrình độ nhận thức của mỗi người. Cho nên con đường giải thoát khổ của mỗi người cũng phải thích ứng theo nguyện vọng của mỗi người. Con đường giải thoát khổ này hướng dẫn
04 Tháng Ba 20209:20 CH(Xem: 348)
Chàng kia nuôi một bầy dê. Đúng theo phương pháp, tay nghề giỏi giang. Nên dê sinh sản từng đàn. Từ ngàn con đến chục ngàn rất mau. Nhưng chàng hà tiện hàng đầu. Không hề dám giết con nào để ăn. Hoặc là đãi khách đến thăm. Dù ai năn nỉ cũng bằng thừa thôi
11 Tháng Hai 20206:36 SA(Xem: 519)
Kinh Thập Thiện là một quyển kinh nhỏ ghi lại buổi thuyết pháp của Phật cho cả cư sĩ lẫn người xuất gia, hoặc cho các loài thủy tộc nhẫn đến bậc A-la-hán và Bồ-tát. Xét hội chúng dự buổi thuyết pháp này, chúng ta nhận định được giá trị quyển kinh thế nào rồi. Pháp Thập thiện là nền tảng đạo đức, cũng là nấc thang đầu
09 Tháng Hai 20204:17 CH(Xem: 506)
Quyển “Kinh Bốn Mươi Hai Chương Giảng Giải” được hình thành qua hai năm ghi chép, phiên tả với lòng chân thành muốn phổ biến những lời Phật dạy. Đầu tiên đây là những buổi học dành cho nội chúng Tu viện Lộc Uyển, sau đó lan dần đến những cư sĩ hữu duyên.
01 Tháng Hai 202010:51 SA(Xem: 709)
“Kinh Chú Tâm Tỉnh Giác” là một trong hai bài kinh căn bảnĐức Phật đã nêu lên một phép luyện tập vô cùng thiết thực, cụ thể và trực tiếp về thiền định, đó là phép thiền định chú tâm thật tỉnh giác và thật mạnh vào bốn lãnh vực thân xác, cảm giác, tâm thức và các hiện tượng tâm thần từ bên trong chúng.
31 Tháng Giêng 20207:00 SA(Xem: 882)
“Kinh Chú Tâm vào Hơi Thở” là một trong hai bài kinh căn bảnĐức Phật đã nêu lên một phép luyện tập vô cùng thiết thực, cụ thể và trực tiếp về thiền định, đó là sự chú tâm thật mạnh dựa vào hơi thở. Bản kinh này được dịch giả Hoang Phong chuyển ngữ từ kinh Anapanasati Sutta (Trung Bộ Kinh, MN 118).
24 Tháng Giêng 20208:00 SA(Xem: 6011)
Phước lành thay, thời gian nầy vui như ngày lễ hội, Vì có một buổi sáng thức dậy vui vẻhạnh phúc, Vì có một giây phút quý báu và một giờ an lạc, Cho những ai cúng dường các vị Tỳ Kheo. Vào ngày hôm ấy, lời nói thiện, làm việc thiện, Ý nghĩ thiện và ước nguyện cao quý, Mang lại phước lợi cho những ai thực hành;